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House Of Representatives Adopts 2015 Draft Budget In Second Reading

Rabat – The house of representatives adopted, on Tuesday during a plenary session, by a majority and in second reading, the 2015 draft budget.The bill was adopted by a majority of 179 votes versus 75 against, with no abstentions.The 2015 draft budget is based on a growth rate of 4.4 pc, a budget deficit of 4.3 pc, an average oil price of 103 dollars per barrel, an exchange rate of 8.6 dirhams/dollar, a reduction of the balance of payments deficit to 6.7 pc and the creation of 22,000 jobs. The draft bill aims to improve the competitiveness of the national economy, promote private investment, speed up key structural reforms, implement regionalization, reduce social differences and boost employment. read more

UN agency expands food relief programme in southern Philippines

20 August 2008The United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) is continuing to dispatch hundreds of tons of rice to families displaced by the violent clashes in the southern Philippines between Government forces and Muslim rebels. WFP announced today in a press release that it has already sent 325 tons of rice to some 13,000 families on the island of Mindanao, where the fighting is occurring.The agency has also agreed to provide 250 tons of rice for 10,000 other families in the provinces of Lanao del Sur and Lanao del Norte – where tens of thousands of people have become displaced – for at least a month.Stephen Anderson, WFP’s Country Director, said the increased assistance follows a rapid assessment by aid officials across the region. The provinces of Sultan Kudarat, South Cotabato and Sarangani have also been affected by the recent violence.“We hope for peace and stability so that affected families in Mindanao can soon return to their homes and begin rebuilding their lives,” he said.“In the current unpredictable security situation, vulnerable victims of these clashes urgently need to receive humanitarian assistance, especially essential food among other complimentary relief items.”Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon issued a statement last week voicing concern about the fighting on Mindanao and the unfolding humanitarian crisis as a result. read more

UN chief arrives in Turkmenistan to kick off fivenation Central Asia tour

1 April 2010Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon arrived today in Turkmenistan to kick off his first visit to Central Asia since becoming the United Nations chief three years ago. The five-nation tour will also include stops in Kyrgyzstan, Uzbekistan, Tajikistan and Kazakhstan.While in Ashgabat, the capital of Turkmenistan, Mr. Ban will meet on Friday with President Gurbanguly Berdimuhamedov, and visit the Office of the UN Regional Centre for Preventive Diplomacy in Central Asia (UNRCCA).Set up in 2007, the Centre works to help the five governments in the region to increase their capacities to peacefully prevent conflict, facilitate dialogue and respond to cross-border threats and challenges such as terrorism, drug trafficking and environmental degradation. Following the Central Asia visit, the Secretary-General is scheduled to travel to Vienna for meetings with senior Austrian Government officials, and to address the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE).He will also chair the spring session of the Chief Executives Board (CEB), the twice-yearly gathering of the heads of 27 agencies, funds and programmes within the UN system. read more

Police blotter Prowler on Oakwood Avenue

A Simcoe woman received an alarming surprise this week when she woke up to discover an unknown man in her home.The woman was sleeping on her couch in her Oakwood Avenue basement when she woke around 1 a.m. Tuesday to find the stranger in her home.As she called police, the intruder retreated upstairs. However, when police searched the residence, nothing was found.No damage was reported and nothing was stolen. Woman struck at ToyotetsuA Brantford woman suffered minor injuries this week when she was struck by a vehicle in the parking lot of the Toyotetsu auto parts plant in Simcoe.The incident was called into police around 8:15 a.m. Tuesday.The vehicle involved was a dark-coloured Chrysler 300. The vehicle did not stop. Police want to speak to the driver.“The OPP would like the motoring public to be aware of their surroundings at all times when they get behind the wheel of any vehicle,” Insp. Joe Varga, head of the Norfolk OPP, said in a news release.“Pedestrians are also urged to put their safety as a priority and to be cautious when crossing any street or parking lot.”Anyone with information that may identify the driver involved is asked to contact the Norfolk OPP at 1-888-310-1122.Information can also be shared with Crime Stoppers of Haldimand and Norfolk at 1-800-222-8477.Callers to Crime Stoppers who help solve a crime are eligible for a cash reward of up to $2,000. Window smashed on Queen StreetA window was broken on Queen Street North in Simcoe last weekend.The vandalism was brought to the attention of police Monday.Norfolk OPP are investigating. Assault charge in CourtlandA Norfolk man was charged after an argument in Courtland last weekend escalated into violence.The incident occurred at a home on Talbot Street Saturday around 10 p.m.Wednesday, a 47-year-old Norfolk man was charged with aggravated assault and uttering threats to cause death or bodily harm. Electronic eye nabs scofflawsTwo disqualified drivers have another date in court thanks to automated licence-plate recognition technology.An officer with the Norfolk OPP was on patrol on Thompson Road West in Waterford this week when an eastbound vehicle set off an alert in the cruiser.The licence-plate technology is programmed to flag licence plates deemed to be in poor standing. The pull-over in this instance occurred Tuesday around 2:45 p.m.Upon further investigation, the officer learned that the driver was not supposed to be behind the wheel.A 34-year-old Norfolk woman has been charged with driving while under suspension. She will answer the charge at a later date in the Ontario Court of Justice at the Norfolk County Court House in Simcoe.This same licence-plate recognition technology assisted police in nabbing another disqualified driver on Monday.Around 4:30 p.m., a Norfolk OPP cruiser was parked alongside Highway 24 north of Simcoe. A passing vehicle alerted the officer that its plates might be problematic.Once the suspect vehicle was pulled over, a 22-year-old Norfolk woman was charged with driving under suspension.  Nails hammered into tiresNails were hammered into the tires of a vehicle parked in Simcoe this week.Two tires were damaged. The vandalism occurred on Queen Street North in the early morning hours of Tuesday.Norfolk OPP are investigating. Suspicious men confrontedPolice want to speak to three men who were spotted behaving suspiciously at a home in Simcoe this week.Around 3:30 p.m. Tuesday, a resident on John Street saw the men at a neighbour’s property. Two of the men walked onto the property and were peering into windows. The third man stood near the sidewalk looking up and down the street.The men fled northbound on John Street when they were confronted.All three are white, heavy-set and about 30 years of age.One was wearing a blue bomber jacket while a second man was wearing a dark-coloured jacket.The suspect who appeared to be acting as the lookout was wearing a bomber jacket with a fur hood. He was wearing sunglasses and a white bandana with a black design. He was also carrying a blue backpack.Anyone with information that might identify these individuals is asked to contact the Norfolk OPP at 1-888-310-1122.Information can also be shared with Crime Stoppers of Haldimand and Norfolk at 1-800-222-8477.Callers to Crime Stoppers who help solve a crime are eligible for a cash reward of up to $2,000. Bicycle taken on John StreetA bicycle was stolen in Simcoe this week.Grainy footage of the suspect was captured on videotape as he broke into a shed on John Street around 1:45 a.m. Wednesday.In the initial footage, the man is seen leaving the area empty-handed.Around 6:20 a.m. the same morning, the suspect returns to the scene and makes off with silver- and black-coloured bicycle.Norfolk OPP are investigating. They are reviewing the images captured to determine the identity of the suspect. read more

UN banks offer cutrate loans for solar power development in India

“This initiative helps to meet both environmental and development objectives by overcoming a major barrier to increasing the use of renewable energy – access to finance,” UNEP Executive Director Klaus Toepfer said.In the southern Indian state of Karnataka, Syndicate Bank and Canara Bank are offering the new loans in which UNEP is “buying down” financing costs of photovoltaic solar home systems. Indian households will effectively be able to purchase systems at an interest rate of approximately 5 per cent, compared to the normal consumer lending rates of 11 to 12 per cent. The programme is made possible with support from the UN Foundation (UNF) and Shell Foundation.By combining two banks and a number of UNEP-qualified solar home system vendors, UNF President Tim Wirth said the programme is a “market-driven approach designed to stimulate competition among vendors and ensure quality products, competitive pricing and reliable after-sales service.”Many Indian households still rely on inefficient and polluting energy sources such as kerosene, which produces negative health, environmental and social impacts. In Karnataka, even where grid electricity is available, problems of capacity shortages and inconsistent quality plague the power supply.Despite high initial costs, UNEP said solar home systems emerge as an attractive option in the context of costly or unreliable alternatives and escalating grid power tariffs and therefore, a growing number of households are turning to solar as a matter of necessity and convenience. read more

Somalia famine killed nearly 260000 people half of them children – reports

“The suffering played out like a drama without witnesses,” said Philippe Lazzarini, UN Humanitarian Coordinator for Somalia, reacting to the findings in a new report funded and commissioned by the UN Food and Agricultural Organization (FAO).Some 133,000 of the Somalis who perished – about half – were children under five, according to FAO’s Food Security and Nutrition Analysis Unit for Somalia (FSNAU), which carried out the study along with the USAID-funded Famine Early Warning Systems Network (FEWS NET).Calling the magnitude of the mortality figures “unsettling”, Mr. Lazzarini said the report confirms “that we could have done more before famine was declared on 20 July 2011” and that it will help ensure “that Somalia never goes through another famine again.”He added that “warnings that began as far back as the drought in 2010 did not trigger sufficient early action. In the worst affected areas, access to people in need was tremendously difficult. At the peak of the crises, between May and August 2011, about 30,000 excess people died per month, according to the study. “An estimated 4.6 per cent of the total population and 10 per cent of children under 5 died in Southern and Central Somalia,” FAO reported. “Lower Shabelle, Mogadishu, and Bay were hardest hit.” A massive mobilization of the humanitarian community helped mitigate the worst effects of the crisis, once famine was declared, the Humanitarian Coordinator continued. “We reached previously inaccessible areas through innovative programming and by strengthening local partnerships.”Since then, the UN community and its partners have changed the way it operates, Mr. Lazzarini said, “With 2.7 million people still in need of life-saving assistance and support to build up their livelihoods, we are redoubling efforts to invest in Somalia’s people and communities to break the cycle of crisis and response.” “We are seeking ways to bridge humanitarian and development work which will be crucial to consolidating the resilience of Somalia’s people and communities,” he added. read more

New GOP ad takes on Beshear on health care issue

The GOP commercial lambasts Beshear for espousing “radical views” on health care.Beshear’s campaign fired back Friday, calling it a desperate smear while accusing Bevin of trying to “rip health care away” from tens of thousands of Kentuckians. FRANKFORT, Ky. (AP) – A new Republican attack ad is slamming Democrat Andy Beshear for backing the Affordable Care Act and opposing Gov. Matt Bevin’s efforts to impose work requirements for some Medicaid recipients. It’s the latest sign that health care looms large in Kentucky’s race for governor.The TV ad backed by the Republican Governors Association overlaps a Beshear campaign commercial. In his ad, Beshear touts his efforts to protect health coverage for pre-existing conditions as attorney general and promises to do the same if elected governor.- Advertisement – read more

United States suspends all Brazilian meat imports

Brazil is the world’s largest beef exporter (Reuters image)(BBC) The United States has suspended Brazilian meat imports over “recurring concerns about the safety of products intended for the American market”.Several countries banned Brazilian meat in March, when prosecutors said health inspectors there had been taking bribes to approve sub-standard meat.The US didn’t impose a ban then; instead, it introduced checks on all of Brazil’s meat shipments.It says now a significant proportion of Brazilian meat failed safety tests.“The Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) has refused entry to 11% of Brazilian fresh beef products” in the past three months, said the US Department of Agriculture in a statement.“That figure is substantially higher than the rejection rate of 1% of shipments from the rest of the world,” it added.The American authorities have refused entry since the end of March to a total of 860,000 kg (1.9 million pounds) of Brazilian meat products over “public health concerns, sanitary conditions, and animal health issues”.‘Operation Weak Flesh’Brazil is the world’s biggest red meat and poultry exporter, selling more than $12bn (£9.7bn) a year.It exports mainly to China, the European Union and the United States.Exports fell sharply when the allegations were made public, following a Federal Police investigation.Meatpacking giants JBS said they were cooperating with the investigation (EPA image)Operation Weak Flesh was launched in the early hours of 17 March in six Brazilian states after a two-year investigation.Federal police carried out raids in 194 locations, deploying more than 1,000 officers.The investigators alleged that some managers bribed health inspectors and politicians to get government certificates for their products.They accused more than 30 companies of a number of unhygienic practices. Among them are JBS, the world’s largest beef exporter, and BRF, the world’s top poultry producer.The bans imposed in the days that followed the scandal were lifted after the Brazilian government closed the meatpacking plants involved and promised to take further action.Analysts say the US government decision is likely to have a negative impact on the Brazilian meat industry. Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)RelatedBrazil says US gave ‘ultimatum’ over steel, aluminium tariffsMay 3, 2018In “Business”‘SPOILED MEAT SCANDAL’: Beware of sausages, meat products imported from BrazilMarch 26, 2017In “Local News”Trinidad joins Jamaica in banning Brazil corned beefMarch 21, 2017In “latest news” read more

Cork twins appeal smashes target despite a setback

first_imgWHEN AUDREY MURNANE was offered two slots in a London hospital for her twins to undergo non-invasive surgery, she sprung into action.The offer will greatly improve the lives of her 19-month-old daughters Zoe and Maya, but the cost was €35,000 and she had just ten days to make the payment to Great Ormond Street Hospital.Mission impossible? Not even close.The total was raised within five days, with everyone from Munster Rugby to two rapping school girls pitching in.Now, despite a setback in receiving the funds, Audrey and the girls are preparing to fly out on Monday.“There was a technical glitch with PayPal transferring the money, so we had missed the deadline.“I went public on Facebook and asked if anyone could help and a good few people came forward and agreed to give us a bridging loan.“One particular person said that he would give us a loan for seven days, or whatever we needed.“We’ve paid him back and everything. The man didn’t even know me but just trusted me. It’s good to know there are such good people out there.Those good people include the readers of this very site.“After TheJournal.ie article went online last week, the hours between 6.30am and 9.30am were the busiest times for donations.”Almost 3,000 people donated to the fund and a Facebook auction planned for tomorrow will add to the fund, which will be used to pay for ongoing treatment of the girls’ Long Segment Tracheal Stenosis, a condition that causes major blockages to airways.PackingWith all of the madness, Audrey says she has yet to even think about things like packing.“I haven’t started doing regular mammy things like packing, washing and ironing. That’s my job for tomorrow and Sunday.”The girls will take the Bumbleance to the airport and will fly to London accompanied by a paramedic. They will then spend around a week in London and will hopefully be home in time for Christmas.Read: Cork mother has ten days to raise €35,000 for twins’ surgerylast_img read more

Une manette à écran tactile pour la prochaine Xbox

first_imgUne manette à écran tactile pour la prochaine Xbox ?Si Microsoft a achevé tout espoir d’une sortie de sa nouvelle console pour cette année, une rumeur est venue combler ce manque : le contrôleur pourrait embarquer un écran tactile.A l’image des produits hi-tech les plus attendus, la future console de Microsoft fait l’objet de toutes les rumeurs sur le net. Si le géant en a récemment infirmé une en annonçant que sa création ne serait pas présentée en 2012, les spéculations vont toujours bon train. À lire aussiMicrosoft Surface RT : la tablette est enfin disponible à la vente physique en FranceSelon le Xbox World Magazine, c’est désormais la manette qui attire les feux des projecteurs. En effet, la console que l’on aime à appeler Xbox 720, se doterait d’un contrôleur à écran tactile entouré de boutons et autres croix directionnelles, à l’instar de la prochaine Wii U de Nintendo. Avec une taille proche de la PS Vita, le joypad de la Xbox serait multi-usages et pourrait donc servir de télécommande pour la TV ou de plateforme pour le Web.Evidemment, tout cela n’est encore une fois que rumeur et le géant américain n’a encore donné aucune information sur sa nouvelle machine dans ce sens là.Le 15 février 2012 à 11:40 • Maxime Lambertlast_img read more

Hollywood Reporter Scales Back Frequency in Relaunch Bid

first_imgThe move was rumored for months and is now apparently coming true: e5 Global Media is transforming The Hollywood Reporter from a weekday paper into a glossy weekly magazine. The title’s new format will kick off next month.In addition to the weekly print publication, THR will produce a daily digital edition that will be sent to current subscriber in PDF format, according to a report in the New York Times. The initiative also calls for “an aggressive and redesigned Web operation built around breaking news.”“I guess it shakes the system out here that a so-called trade would dare to break news that wasn’t spoon fed,” recently-hired editorial director Janice Min says in the report. “Well, people had better get used to it.” Min was brought on to lead the magazine’s edit operation in May. Min left consumer celebrity title Us Weekly last year after her contract with owner Jan Wenner ended. During her time there as editor-in-chief—a position she held since 2003—the magazine more than doubled its circulation and won several awards.Having undergone a series of deep staff cuts and other cost-cutting initiatives under Nielsen Business Media, THR—along with seven other trade entertainment brands—was sold to e5 Global Media, a new group formed by Pluribus Capital Management and financial services firm Guggenheim Partners. It installed Condé Nast Fairchild Fashion Group president and CEO Richard “Mad Dog” Beckman as chief executive.[Image via NYT]last_img read more

Apple please I am consumed with subscription fatigue

first_imgAfter Apple’s services-focused event this week, I felt a wave of sadness. It continued when I went home, and during dinner, and as I tucked my kids into bed. Later, I sat on the sofa as my wife talked to me about how much we spend, and how we need to reconsider our budget. I was steeped in melancholy. What was going on? The subscriptions. It was the subscriptions. Apple’s whole event was about subscription content. Services you can have, for just the cost of… well, we don’t know how much all of them will cost yet. I was already thinking about cutting back on my subscriptions. And so was my wife. She’d started looking at our spending, and all the things that we’ve been paying for that we’ve not been thinking about. The gym membership we don’t use. Apple Music. All three streaming services we have. (Do we need Amazon, Hulu and Netflix? I don’t want to get rid of them.) I pick up my phone. I scroll and scroll, as if it will calm me down. I see an advertisement for the Criterion Channel. I love Criterion! Another channel. Wait, how many can I pay for? I’m drowning in them. The night of the Apple event, my wife and I spent hours poring through credit card statements, and I felt my stomach turn. I have subscription fatigue. Subscription anxiety. Subscription dread. It’s a feeling that’s started overwhelming me slowly over time, little by little, turning from mild concern to waves of depression. And Monday was my breaking point. I’m looking over the monthly bills I don’t want to acknowledge, the costs of living I’ve slowly piled on, and it makes me want to cry. Just $9.99 more. Screenshot by Scott Stein/CNET Apple’s betting everything now on subscriptions. Or not everything, certainly, but Apple would like us to pay up. Just a little bit more. Here, there. Apple News Plus is $10 a month. We don’t know about Apple Arcade for gaming, or Apple TV Plus for shows. Then there’s iCloud. Apple Music. The cost of the devices themselves. Phone service. Suddenly, or more than ever, we’re subscribing to everything. We rent the world we live in. Micropayments everywhere. Apple doesn’t seem to acknowledge this subscription overload. And in the middle of it all, dangled like a magic carrot on a string: a credit card, of all things, promising better budgeting. We’re heading toward a future where we rent everything, and it’s unsustainable.   Mentioned Above Apple TV 4K (32GB) Aug 31 • iPhone 11, Apple Watch 5 and more: The final rumors $179 Apple TV 4K $179 Aug 31 • iPhone XR vs. iPhone 8 Plus: Which iPhone should you buy? $169 Best Buy reading • Apple, please, I am consumed with subscription fatigue See It Share your voice Apple I’ve hit peak subscription fatigue. My wife has, I have, and many people I know have. We’re heading toward a future where we rent everything, and it’s unsustainable. Right now I’m staring that daily rent in the face and realizing I don’t think I can hurdle it. It’s a disturbing feeling. It’s a sad feeling. It’s something like the dystopian nightmares of George Saunders and Gary Shteyngart rolled into reality. Super Sad True Subscription Story. With all the shows, the music, the games, the magazines, the endless apps, there’s a limit. Everyone has budgets, and financial concerns, and ceilings. Maybe I can keep better track of my subscriptions with my Apple Card. But this glowing world of happy things is a rentable luxury, and Apple’s not giving any clear sense of how to make any of it work with your wallet. It’s not just Apple, though. It’s everything. The shows I like come and go from services I borrow. The albums I listen to are held in a cloud, and it’s completely transient. If I stop paying, I have nothing. The games on online services, in some cases, are gone when I’m done. Subscriptions to Office 365, or Adobe Creative Cloud. Subscriptions to a world we’re only buying time from. What do we have? Is ownership a myth in the first place? Do we just turn to dust in the end? Maybe it’s all temporary. But subscriptions are a slow sad death to me, a promise of a world I can’t keep forever. And I don’t want to add any more. It’s showtime for Apple’s streaming service Tags Preview • Apple TV 4K: New $179 Apple streamer adds HDR, better gaming See It Review • Apple TV 4K review: The best TV streamer keeps getting better Cord Cutters (OTT) Apple See It Aug 31 • Best places to sell your used electronics in 2019 Amazon Prime Google Hulu Netflix Apple See it Aug 31 • Your phone screen is gross. Here’s how to clean it 97 Photos CNET may get a commission from retail offers. $179 21 Comments See All • Online TV and Movies Crutchfieldlast_img read more

New Details Of Plane Crash In Trinity Bay Local Group Drove Spike

first_img Share Tuesday, March 5, 2019Top afternoon stories:National Safety Transportation Board (NTSB)An NTSB engineer inspects memory boards from the cockpit voice recorder of Atlas Air Flight 3591.New Details Of Plane Crash In Trinity BayThe pilots of the cargo plane that crashed into Trinity Bay on February 23 lost control of the aircraft approximately 18 seconds before the cockpit voice recorder (CVR) stopped recording, according to the investigation the National Safety Transportation Board (NTSB) is conducting.The NTSB said in a news release that the review of the cockpit voice recorder also indicates the crew of Atlas Air Flight 3591 were in communication with Houston air traffic controllers and were being provided radar vectors for the approach into Bush Intercontinental Airport.NTSB investigators are also validating the data recorded by the flight data recorder, which arrived at the agency’s lab on Sunday night.Photo provided by the Anti-Defamation LeagueApproximately 25 Patriot Front members and associates demonstrated in front of the George Washington statue at the University of Texas in November of 2017.Local Group Drove Spike In White Supremacist Activity In 2018Activity by white supremacist groups spiked nationwide over the past year. One of the most active is a Texas-based organization with Houston ties.The Anti-Defamation League tracked 1,187 instances of propaganda by white supremacist groups in 2018, nearly triple the number in 2017. More than a quarter of those stemmed from one Texas group: Patriot Front.“It’s an alt-right group. It’s a relatively new group that started last year. Their founder and leader is a guy named Thomas Rousseau who’s from Dallas,” said Dena Marks, senior associate director of the ADL’s Southwest Regional Office. Patriot Front leaflets campuses and neighborhoods and organizes flash demonstrations.“There was one that happened last year at an ice house on West Alabama, where some Patriot Front members came in and started yelling at people who were holding an immigration information session there,” Marks said. She asks that anyone finding Patriot Front flyers notify the ADL.Texas House of RepresentativesTexas State Representative Ron Reynolds.Texas Lawmaker Proposes Reparations For Descendants Of Sugar Land 95State Representative Ron Reynolds has filed legislation proposing that Texas pays $95 million in reparations to the descendants of 95 African American prison inmates who were forced to work in a Sugar Land plantation while they were serving their time in the 19th century. The remains of the inmates are often referred to by members of the community and elected officials as the Sugar Land 95.A contractor discovered the remains in February of 2018 while working on the initial phase to build a career and technical center for the Fort Bend County Independent School District. The inmates were part of the convict lease system, which started in Texas in 1867.The issue has sparked controversy on what to do with the remains and Fort Bend County and the school district are currently negotiating a permanent plan.Reynolds’ legislation is a joint resolution proposing a constitutional amendment to require payment of the reparations. He told News 88.7 his goal is that each descendant of the 95 inmates receives $1 million. Reynolds said the money could come from the state’s General Revenue Fund or from the Economic Stabilization Fund, commonly referred to as the Rainy Day Fund.last_img read more

Universum War Front is a game you wont believe was created by

first_imgTake a quick look at the gallery of images above, and then take the time to watch the Kickstarter video below. I think you’ll agree that as a game, Universum: War Front looks stunning. But what’s incredible about this project is the fact it has been made by just one guy acting as programmer, artist, animator, and game designer.His name is Cyril Megem, and he used to be lead artist working at French publishing company Monte Christo. Last year he decided to quit and create his own game as an indie developer, with the result being Universum: War Front just over a year later. His only help has been from Brian Dinh, who recently joined the team to handle promotion and community work.Now Universum is on Kickstarter, but Cyril is only asking for $20,000 to finish it. That’s a lot less than many other games ask for on Kickstarter, and they don’t look half as good as this and have a comparably large team behind them. That fact alone will get the project lots of pledges, especially when you can secure a copy of the game for just $10.Cyril says Universum has been inspired by Warhammer, Battlefield, DOTA, and Star Wars. He describes the game as an “FPS, RTS, MOBA RPG in one Space Epic.” When playing you can switch from controlling a group of soldiers to taking control of just one. Characters are customizable, you can drive a range of vehicles, mechs, and even alien creatures. And did we mention how stunning it looks?At the time of writing the game has already reached $19,000 with 24 days still left to go, so there’s no doubt Universum: War Front is going to get funded. There’s also stretch goals taking it up as far as $500,000. I doubt it will get that high, but the $50,000 and $75,000 goals are certainly in reach if it gets some momentum behind it. VIEW PHOTO GALLERY Universum: War FrontUniversum: War FrontUniversum: War FrontUniversum: War FrontUniversum: War FrontUniversum: War FrontUniversum: War FrontUniversum: War FrontUniversum: War FrontUniversum: War FrontUniversum: War FrontUniversum: War FrontUniversum: War FrontUniversum: War FrontUniversum: War FrontUniversum: War Frontlast_img read more

New imaging technique may allow scientists to better understand how proteins work

first_img A new technique to watch proteins in action involves applying large voltage pulses to protein crystals simultaneously with X-ray pulses. At right is a close-up view of a crystal sandwiched between electrodes that deliver the voltage. Credit: UT Southwestern The group reports that they used the technique to study the human ubiquitin ligase protein which is part of the PDZ domain and found new information regarding how it actually works. As part of the never-ending search to fully understand how living entities work, scientists have developed a multitude of imaging techniques—one of these, X-ray crystallography, has been used to study molecules from living creatures, and more specifically, proteins. Its use has led to many breakthroughs in biomedical science, but it suffers from one serious problem—it does not allow researchers to see how a protein actually does its job; instead, it simply offers structural imagery. The researchers note that there are other technologies that offer some assistance in studying the workings of proteins, some of which can even track motion, but most work only under certain conditions or with certain proteins. In this new effort, the researchers report on how they combined two technologies to allow future researchers to capture imagery of virtually any kind of protein doing its work.The new technique involves taking X-ray images of protein reactions during application of an electric field—protein processes, they note, are generally controlled by electromagnetic forces. Protein crystals are placed between glass capillaries containing a wire that applies an electric force across the crystals as they are subjected to X-ray pulses. The results can be seen in diffraction patterns recorded over several intervals—just prior to an electric pulse, and then again at 50, 100 and 200 nanoseconds. The team notes that the technique should work for studying virtually any protein, potentially offering a new tool to assist in designing new proteins or drugs. Journal information: Nature © 2016 Phys.org New method allows easy separation of membrane proteins (Phys.org)—A team of researchers with UT Southwestern Medical Center and the University of Chicago has developed a new imaging technique that may give scientists a relatively simple means to unravel which parts of proteins give them their function. In their paper published in the journal Nature, the team describes their new method, which combines strong electric field pulse applications and time-resolved X-ray crystallography.center_img Explore further More information: Doeke R. Hekstra et al. Electric-field-stimulated protein mechanics, Nature (2016). DOI: 10.1038/nature20571AbstractThe internal mechanics of proteins—the coordinated motions of amino acids and the pattern of forces constraining these motions—connects protein structure to function. Here we describe a new method combining the application of strong electric field pulses to protein crystals with time-resolved X-ray crystallography to observe conformational changes in spatial and temporal detail. Using a human PDZ domain (LNX2PDZ2) as a model system, we show that protein crystals tolerate electric field pulses strong enough to drive concerted motions on the sub-microsecond timescale. The induced motions are subtle, involve diverse physical mechanisms, and occur throughout the protein structure. The global pattern of electric-field-induced motions is consistent with both local and allosteric conformational changes naturally induced by ligand binding, including at conserved functional sites in the PDZ domain family. This work lays the foundation for comprehensive experimental study of the mechanical basis of protein function. Left, The crystal is mounted on the bottom electrode and the high voltage is delivered from a top electrode through a liquid junction composed of crystallization solution. Controlled back pressure on a reservoir of solution in the top electrode keeps the crystal continuously hydrated. Right, A view of the assembled experimental apparatus. Credit: (c) Nature (2016). DOI: 10.1038/nature20571 Citation: New imaging technique may allow scientists to better understand how proteins work (2016, December 9) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2016-12-imaging-technique-scientists-proteins.html This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

Old Dog New Pics This New Nikon Camera Case Lets Your Pup

first_imgMay 30, 2015 2 min read Picture your dog taking pictures. Then picture yourself taking pictures of your dog taking pictures. You know you want to.Thanks to the canine-friendly engineers at Nikon Asia, your pup could one day become a flashy #dogarazzi, without even knowing it. No joke. The Japanese camera maker is teasing a strap-on ”smart” camera case that lets man’s best friend snap pics.Related: 7 Lessons in Leadership From the Dogs of the Westminster Dog ShowThe lightweight 3-D printed rig, worn with an included harness, takes photos whenever Sir Barks a Lot’s heart flutters with excitement. So that would be, like, every few — squirrel! — seconds. Using sensors, the tech, fittingly called Heartography, continuously measures its furry wearer’s heart rate. When Fido’s ticker jumps for joy, then — *snap* — a pic is automagically taken. So many feels captured on the run. Just imagine the reams of riveting action shots of fire hydrants, food bowls, tennis balls and, yup, other pups’ hind quarters to come. Well, what do you expect? We’re talking dogs here, people.Related: Want to Be a Better Manager? Get a Dog.Dying to get your paws on your own Heartography? Sorry, fur baby mamas and papas. The poochy case — which of course is made to hold (and promote) a Nikon COOLpix L31 — isn’t on the market yet. No official word yet on when it will be either.Hmmm. Maybe GoPro’s dog camera harness Fetch got Nikon’s tail wagging for a bite of the budding dogographer market. We blame Lady Gaga’s snap-happy French bulldog Asia.Instagram, prepare thyself. Photography has gone to the dogs.   Related: Forget Cat Cafes, It’s Time for a Coffee Joint for Dogslast_img read more

WEBINAR Pancreatic Cancer Outcome Highlights via Ontable Adaptive MRguided Radiation

first_imgView the archived webinar. FacebookTwitterLinkedInPrint分享 News | Radiation Therapy | August 15, 2019 First Patient Enrolled in World’s Largest Brain Cancer Clinical Trial Henry Ford Cancer Institute is first-in-the-world to enroll a glioblastoma patient in the GBM AGILE Trial (Adaptive… read more Presenters:Percy Lee, M.D.Associate Professor Vice Chair, Education Director, Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy ProgramDavid Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA , UCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer CenterDr. Lee is an associate professor and vice chair of education for the Department of Radiation Oncology at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA and the UCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center. Lee is the clinical director of the stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) program and the chief of service for the thoracic and GI radiation cncology programs in the department. He also serves as the residency training program drector as well as the director for the medical student clerkship. Lee attended the Johns Hopkins University and graduated with the highest honors majoring in biomedical engineering with a concentration in chemical engineering. He attended Harvard Medical School and the Harvard-MIT Health Science and Technology Program where he received his M.D., and graduated magna cum laude. At Harvard, he was also a Howard Hughes Medical Institute fellow. He interned at the Massachusetts General Hospital and received specialty training in radiation oncology from Stanford University School of Medicine. News | Radiation Therapy | August 16, 2019 Drug Accelerates Blood System’s Recovery After Radiation, Chemotherapy A drug developed by UCLA physician-scientists and chemists speeds up the regeneration of mouse and human blood stem… read more About ViewRayViewRay Inc. (Nasdaq: VRAY) designs, manufactures and markets the MRIdian radiation therapy system. MRIdian integrates MRI technology, radiation delivery and proprietary software to locate, target and track the position and shape of soft-tissue tumors during radiation. ViewRay believes this combination of enhanced visualization and accuracy will significantly improve outcomes for patients.ViewRay and MRIdian are registered trademarks of ViewRay Inc. The top piece of content in July was a video interview explaining how Princess Margaret Cancer Center is using machine learning to create automated treatment plans. This was a hot topic at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting in July.  News | Proton Therapy | August 06, 2019 IBA Signs Contract to Install Proton Therapy Center in Kansas IBA (Ion Beam Applications S.A.) recently signed a contract and received the first payment for a Proteus One solution… read more News | Radiation Therapy | August 02, 2019 Varian Showcases Cancer Care Systems and Software at AAPM 2019 Varian showcased systems and software from its cancer care portfolio, including the Identify Guidance System, at the… read more The webinar “Pancreatic Cancer Outcome Highlights via On-table Adaptive MR-guided Radiation” was presented by Parag Parikh, BSE, M.D., associate professor of radiation oncology and biomedical engineering at Washington University in St. Louis, and Percy Lee, M.D., associate professor and vice chair of education for the Department of Radiation Oncology at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA and the UCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center. They will share their ongoing experience in using MR-guided radiation therapy to treat pancreatic cancer.The webinar took place Tuesday, Oct. 24, 2017.View the archived webinar.This presentation includes highlights of significant outcomes and treatment protocols currently used with their patients. The webinar will compliment the presenters’ poster published at ASTRO17, “Higher Maximum Biologic Effective Dose Utilizing Adaptive MRI Guided Radiation Therapy Improves Survival of Inoperable Pancreatic Cancer Patients,” which provided a retrospective review of 42 locally-advanced pancreatic cancer patients treated at four institutions:- Washington University and Siteman Cancer Center at Barnes-Jewish Hospital, St. Louis- University of California, Los Angeles Health System and Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center- University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer Center in Madison- VU University Medical Center in Amsterdam, NetherlandsThe study found that stereotactic dosing regimens guided by MR imaging using the MRIdian system and daily online adaptation had led to significantly prolonged patient survival and resulted in favorably low toxicity. News | Patient Positioning Radiation Therapy | August 15, 2019 Mevion and C-RAD Release Integration for Improved Proton Therapy Treatment Quality Mevion Medical Systems and C-RAD announced the integration between the C-RAD Catalyst PT and the Mevion S250i proton… read more Catalyst PT image courtesy of C-RAD Feature | August 05, 2019 | Dave Fornell, Editor Most Popular Radiology and Radiotherapy Topics in July 2019 August 5, 2019 — Here is the list of the most popular content on the Imaging Technology New (ITN) magazine website fr read more News | Brachytherapy Systems | August 14, 2019 Efficacy of Isoray’s Cesium Blu Showcased in Recent Studies August 14, 2019 — Isoray announced a trio of studies recently reported at scientific meetings and published in medica read more Videos | Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President … read more Related Content The MD Anderson Proton Therapy Center expansion is expected to be completed in 2023. Rendering courtesy of Stantec. News | Patient Positioning Radiation Therapy | August 07, 2019 Qfix kVue One Proton Couch Top Validated by Mevion Medical Systems Qfix and Mevion Medical Systems announced that a special version of the kVue One Proton couch top is now both validated… read more Sponsored Content | Webinar | Radiation Therapy| October 13, 2017 WEBINAR: Pancreatic Cancer Outcome Highlights via On-table Adaptive MR-guided Radiation Following radiation, the bone marrow shows nearly complete loss of blood cells in mice (left). Mice treated with the PTP-sigma inhibitor displayed rapid recovery of blood cells (purple, right). Credit: UCLA Broad Stem Cell Research Center/Nature Communications News | Proton Therapy | August 08, 2019 MD Anderson to Expand Proton Therapy Center The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center unveiled plans to expand its Proton Therapy Center during a… read more Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 7:33Loaded: 2.15%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -7:33 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button. Parag Parikh, BSE, M.DBSE Associate Professor of Radiation OncologyWashington University School of Medicine in St. Louis Parag Parikh, BSE, M.D. is an associate professor of radiation oncology and biomedical engineering at Washington University in St. Louis. He serves as the chief of the gastrointestinal radiation oncology service at Washington University School of Medicine – Barnes Jewish Hospital – Siteman Cancer Center. He sees 400 new patients with pancreatic, liver, rectal and anal cancers per year. He has been routinely using MR-guided radiation therapy for three years, and will be coordinating a multicenter trial with UCLA and other institutions that looks at high dose radiation delivered with MR-guided radiation therapy to treat pancreatic cancer.last_img read more

WEB EXCLUSIVE Novocure Leverages Electricity Against Toughest Cancers

first_img News | Radiation Oncology | July 31, 2019 Laura Dawson, M.D., FASTRO, Chosen as ASTRO President-elect The members of the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) elected four new officers to ASTRO’s Board of… read more News | Brachytherapy Systems | August 14, 2019 Efficacy of Isoray’s Cesium Blu Showcased in Recent Studies August 14, 2019 — Isoray announced a trio of studies recently reported at scientific meetings and published in medica read more New PossibilitiesAt the annual meeting of the American Society of Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) 2018, the company described ongoing studies to extend the technology to patients with pancreatic and recurrent ovarian cancers, as well as mesothelioma. The company is supporting studies of patients with cancers that don’t metastasize beyond the region that can be covered by Optune’s electrode array. This — the lack of metastasis outside a region — is the second criterion that defines the use of Optune, according to Weinberg, who explains that the arrays must be able to completely cover the diseased area.In this way Novocure does what can be done while still emphasizing the needs of the patient. Profitability is a lesser priority. This is exemplified by the company’s work regarding mesothelioma. Only about 4,000 new cases of mesothelioma occur in the U.S. annually, Weinberg explained — fewer than would typically rate doing clinical trials to support the development of a treatment. Yet the company is conducting clinical trials to assess the impact of Optune on this disease.The work began after laboratory tests showed that mesothelioma cells are particularly sensitive to the TTFs generated by Optune. Recognizing that the standard of care — which currently is based on cytotoxic chemotherapy — has not changed since 2009, Novocure decided to make mesothelioma a focus for future clinical application.Optune’s electrical fields disrupt the multiplication of cancer cells by delivering alternating electric fields over the region where the disease is located. The current Optune product is second generation. The field generator, which the patient carries, is half the size and half the weight of the first gen system. Its development “was purely for the benefit of the patient — so (Optune) could be integrated into their lives,” Weinberg said, noting that Optune is designed to be used at home. To succeed, it must have a minimal impact on the patient’s life, he said: “We must always keep in mind the patient’s need to live with and accept it.”Optune must be as inconspicuous as possible, which is why the company changed the color of the electrodes worn by GBM patients on their scalps from white to flesh tone.GBM patients have to deal with the almost inevitable recurrence of cancer, Weinberg said. “Because microscopic metastases cannot be resected in the brain by the neurosurgeons, there is a need for a local regional therapy that continuously treats the tumor better than the maintenance chemotherapy can do,” he said.  News | Patient Positioning Radiation Therapy | August 15, 2019 Mevion and C-RAD Release Integration for Improved Proton Therapy Treatment Quality Mevion Medical Systems and C-RAD announced the integration between the C-RAD Catalyst PT and the Mevion S250i proton… read more News | Radiation Therapy | August 02, 2019 Varian Showcases Cancer Care Systems and Software at AAPM 2019 Varian showcased systems and software from its cancer care portfolio, including the Identify Guidance System, at the… read more News | Proton Therapy | August 08, 2019 MD Anderson to Expand Proton Therapy Center The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center unveiled plans to expand its Proton Therapy Center during a… read more Following radiation, the bone marrow shows nearly complete loss of blood cells in mice (left). Mice treated with the PTP-sigma inhibitor displayed rapid recovery of blood cells (purple, right). Credit: UCLA Broad Stem Cell Research Center/Nature Communications ASTRO PresentationsReports presented at ASTRO 2018 show how Optune might be used in the future, describing how the technology, for example, might improve the outcome of radiation therapy, according to Weinberg. The company is also supporting ongoing clinical trials targeting locally advanced cancer, including recurrent ovarian cancer that has proven resistant to platinum, one of the chief chemotherapeutic agents used against recurrent tumors of this type. A pilot study is underway against liver cancer.“We have chosen to limit our enrollment to patient populations that could benefit the most from TTFs. Also we select patients with locally advanced disease only,” he said, noting that liver and ovarian cancers tend to spread locally. Similarly, in its trials against pancreatic cancer, the company recruits only patients with disease that has not spread beyond the abdomen.  In this way Novocure balances its philosophy of developing treatments for patients in great need with practical concerns of limiting the use of Optune to patients who are most likely to benefit. News | Radiation Therapy | August 16, 2019 Drug Accelerates Blood System’s Recovery After Radiation, Chemotherapy A drug developed by UCLA physician-scientists and chemists speeds up the regeneration of mouse and human blood stem… read more The MD Anderson Proton Therapy Center expansion is expected to be completed in 2023. Rendering courtesy of Stantec. News | Proton Therapy | August 06, 2019 IBA Signs Contract to Install Proton Therapy Center in Kansas IBA (Ion Beam Applications S.A.) recently signed a contract and received the first payment for a Proteus One solution… read more center_img News | Patient Positioning Radiation Therapy | August 07, 2019 Qfix kVue One Proton Couch Top Validated by Mevion Medical Systems Qfix and Mevion Medical Systems announced that a special version of the kVue One Proton couch top is now both validated… read more Related Content Videos | Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, read more Optune’s electrical fields disrupt the multiplication of cancer cells by delivering alternating electric fields over the region where the disease is located.They are the most difficult forms of cancer to treat — glioblastoma multiforme, pancreatic and recurrent ovarian. Their tenacity is one reason Novocure has chosen to fight them.“We select our targets considering the need and potential to make a difference for cancer patients,” said Uri Weinberg, M.D., Ph.D., vice president of clinical development at Novocure. “We want to improve patients’ quality of life and (length of) survival.”The company has had remarkable success, notably using its electrical fields against glioblastoma. This form of cancer is almost uniformly fatal. But, when Optune’s tumor treating fields (TTFs) are applied — which involves wearing an electrode array for as many as 18 hours a day following surgical resection and radiation therapy, and during chemotherapy — patient survival has increased up to 37 percent, a fact documented in late 2017 by clinical results published in the Journal of the American Medical Association. It was the first clinical trial in more than a decade to demonstrate statistically and clinically significant extension of overall survival of patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) regardless of patient characteristics, according to the company.Optune has been FDA cleared for sale since October 2015 as an adjunct to radiation and chemotherapy for newly diagnosed GBM patients whose brain tumors have been removed as thoroughly as possible. Catalyst PT image courtesy of C-RAD News | Radiation Therapy | August 15, 2019 First Patient Enrolled in World’s Largest Brain Cancer Clinical Trial Henry Ford Cancer Institute is first-in-the-world to enroll a glioblastoma patient in the GBM AGILE Trial (Adaptive… read more For additional ASTRO information, see “WEB EXCLUSIVE: Market for MRI-based RT Could Soon Widen,” “WEB EXCLUSIVE: Smart Machines To Empower Oncology Docs and Patients, Say ASTRO Experts” and “WEB EXCLUSIVE: SBRT As Safe And Effective As Conventional RT For Some Prostate Cancer Patients.” FacebookTwitterLinkedInPrint分享 Pierre Qian explains radiotherapy to ablate VTVideo Player is loading.Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 7:34Loaded: 2.19%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -7:34 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button. Feature | Radiation Oncology | October 24, 2018 | By Greg Freiherr WEB EXCLUSIVE: Novocure Leverages Electricity Against Toughest Cancers This article concludes the web exclusive series from Consulting Editor Greg Freiherr, reporting live from the show floor at ASTRO 2018last_img read more

VIDEO New Alpha Emitter Brachytherapy Seeds in Development

first_img CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor FacebookTwitterLinkedInPrint分享 Artificial Intelligence | July 12, 2019 VIDEO: The Economics of Artificial Intelligence Khan Siddiqui, M.D., founder and CEO of HOPPR, discusses the economic advantages and costs presented by artificial intelligence (AI) applications in radiology, as well as potential strategies for healthcare providers looking to add AI to their armamentarium, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Recent Videos View all 606 items Find more SCCT news and videos Women’s Health View all 62 items RSNA | April 03, 2019 VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018 ITN Editor Dave Fornell takes a tour of some of the most interesting new medical imaging technologies displayed on the expo floor at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. The video includes new technologies for fetal ultrasound, CT, MRI, mobile DR X-ray, a new generation of fluoroscopy systems, MRI contrast mapping to better identify tumors, and a new technique to create moving X-ray images from standard DR imaging.Watch the related VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Artificial Intelligence Technologies at RSNA 2018. This inlcudes a tour of some of the recently FDA-cleared AI technologies for medical imaging at RSNA 2018.  Interventional Radiology | June 26, 2019 VIDEO: How Alexa Might Help During Interventional Radiology Procedures Kevin Seals, M.D., University of California San Francisco (UCSF) Health, interventional radiology fellow, is working on a research project using smart speakers such as the Amazon Echo and Google Home to create a new method for accessing information on device technologies in real time in the interventional radiology (IR) lab. Operators can use the conversational voice interface to retrieve information without breaking sterile scrub. The technology uses using natural language processing (NLP) and machine learning to rapidly provide information about device sizing and compatibility in IR.Seals spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference in Chicago in June. Computed Tomography (CT) | January 08, 2016 RSNA Technology Report 2015: Computed Tomography Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of computed tomography (CT) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. The video includes Freiherr during his booth tours with some of the key vendors who were featuring new technology. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Related content:Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical CareSmart Speaker Technology Harnessed for Hospital Medical Treatments Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Related GE Edison Platform Content:GE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison PlatformVIDEO: itnTV Conversations — What is Edison? Enterprise Imaging | July 08, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 1 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy. Radiation Therapy | December 06, 2018 Technology Report: Patient-centered Care in Radiation Therapy Radiation therapy has become increasingly effective and safe as vendors continue to innovate technologies that benefit the patient. At ASTRO 2018, this patient-centric approach was exemplified and demonstrated not only in ways that match treatments to patients, but in how technologies can adjust to patient movement and anatomical changes, and to increase the precision of treatments. ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr showcases several new technologies that are helping to advance this field.For additional patient-centered care coverage, see:Conversations with Greg Freiherr: The Accuray PhilosophyASTRO Puts Patients First Related Cardiac Sarcoidosis Content:ASNC and SNMMI Release Joint Document on Diagnosis, Treatment of Cardiac SarcoidosisNew PET-CT Scan Improves Detection in Rare Cardiac Condition25 Most Impactful Nuclear Cardiology ArticlesRecent Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging Technology Find more news and videos from AAPM. Interventional Radiology | October 19, 2018 VIDEO: Y90 Embolization of Liver Cancer at Henry Ford Hospital Scott Schwartz, M.D., interventional radiologist and program director for IR residencies and the vascular and interventional radiology fellowship at Henry Ford Hospital, explains how the department uses Yttrium-90 (Y90) embolization therapy to treat liver cancer.Find more content on Henry Ford Hospital Women’s Health | March 25, 2019 VIDEO: Ultrasound Versus MRI for Imaging of the Female Pelvis Deborah Levine, M.D., professor of radiology at Harvard Medical School and vice chair for academic affairs in the Department of Radiology at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, describes scenarios where magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could be more useful than ultrasound in issues with the female pelvis. Radiology Imaging View all 288 items Information Technology | April 15, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Vital Images Helps Build Infrastructure for the Future Vital Images has developed a strategy that allows its customers to capture revenues that are otherwise missed while building the infrastructure for the future. In an interview with itnTV, Vital Images executives Larry Sitka and Geoffrey Clemmons describe how the company has reconciled this vision of the future with near-term realities. Related GE Edison Platform Content:VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison PlatformGE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison Platform Advanced Visualization | April 01, 2019 VIDEO: The GE iCenter Looks Toward the Future of New Technologies GE Healthcare goes beyond core equipment maintenance to help clients solve some of their most important asset and clinical performance challenges through digital solutions. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Molecular Imaging View all 22 items Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Clinical Decision Support | June 29, 2017 VIDEO: Clinical Decision Support Requirements for Cardiac Imaging Rami Doukky, M.D., system chair, Division of Cardiology, professor of medicine, Cook County Health and Hospitals System, Chicago, discusses the new CMS requirements for clinical decision support (CDS) appropriate use criteria (AUC) documentation in cardiac imaging starting on Jan. 1, 2018. He spoke at the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today meeting. Read the article “CMS to Require Appropriate Use Criteria Documentation for Medical Imaging Orders.” Radiation Therapy | February 21, 2019 VIDEO: Whole Versus Partial Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Christy Kesslering, M.D., medical director of radiation oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center, about the different radiation therapy options for breast cancer patients offered at the center.Watch the VIDEOs Advancements in Radiation Therapy for Brain Cancer and Multidisciplinary Treatment of Brain Tumors with Vinai Gondi, M.D., director of research and CNS neuro-oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center.Additional videos and coverage of Northwestern Medicine Find more news and videos from AAPM. Find more SCCT news and videos Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Related Artificial Intelligence ContentTechnology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017VIDEO: RSNA Post-game Report on Artificial IntelligenceVIDEO: AI in Tumor Diagnostics, Treatment and Follow-upVIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Help Reduce Gadolinium Dose in MRIVIDEO: AI, Analytics and Informatics: The Future is Here Nuclear Imaging | April 28, 2017 VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida and past-president of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), discusses advancements in nuclear imaging and some of the issues facing the subspecialty. SPECT-CT | December 12, 2018 VIDEO: Walk Around of the Veriton SPECT-CT System This is a walk around of the new Spectrum Dynamics Veriton SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system introduced at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. This is a walk around of an innovative new SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system shown at the Radiological Society Of North America (RSNA) 2018 meeting this week. It’s CT system with comes in 16, 64 or 128 slice configurations. It has 12 SPECT detector robotic arms that automatically move toward the patient and use a sensor to stop a few millimeters from the skin to optimize photon counts and SPECT image quality. It also uses more sensitive CZT digital detectors, which allows either faster scan times, or use of only half the radiotracer dose of analog detector scans.Read the article “Nuclear Imaging Moves Toward Digital Detector Technology.” Read the article “Spectrum Dynamics Sues GE for Theft, Misappropriation of Trade Secrets and Unfair Competition.” Sponsored Videos View all 142 items Radiation Oncology | May 13, 2019 Patient-first Innovations from Accuray at ASTRO 2018 At ASTRO 2018, Accuray showcased new patient-first innovations, including motion synchronization on Radixact, and the new CK VoLO, a fast optimizer on the CyberKnife system. Andrew Delao, senior director of marketing for Accuray, highlights the new features. AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Trends in Medical Physics at the AAPM 2019 meeting Mahadevappa Mahesh, Ph.D., chief of medical physicist and professor of radiology and medical physics, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, and treasurer of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains some of the trends in medical physics and new features of the AAPM 2019 meeting. Watch the related VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care — Interview with AAPM President Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., at the 2019 AAPM meeting. Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Agfa Highlights its DR Solutions Agfa highlights how its digital radiography (DR) systems capture analytics data to help improve management of the radiology department, show ROI on DR investments, and explains how its image processing software works.  Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch the video “Technology Report: DR Systems.” Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Information Technology | April 17, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Creating an Interoperability Strategy With Intellispace Enterprise Edition as the foundation, Philips Healthcare is connecting facilities and service areas within enterprises, while developing standards-based interoperability that preserves customers’ investments and best of breed systems.  Find more news and videos from AAPM. Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Related content:VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice — Interview with Lawrence Tanenbaum, M.D.VIDEO: AI That Second Reads Radiology Reports and Deals With Incidental Findings — Interview with Nina Kottler, M.D.Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice Artificial Intelligence | March 28, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison Platform GE launched a new brand that covers artificial intelligence (AI) at the Radiological Socoety of North American (RSNA) 2018 meeting. The company showed several works-in-progress, including a critical care suite of algorithms and experimental applications for brain MR. Each is being built on GE’s Edison Platform. Enterprise Imaging | January 14, 2019 Technology Report: Enterprise Imaging 2018 In Enterprise Imaging 2018: Balancing Strategy and Technology in Enterprise Imaging, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of enterprise imaging advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting. Enterprise Imaging | April 26, 2019 VIDEO: A Transformative Approach to Reducing Cost and Complexity at CarolinaEast Health System CarolinaEast Health System, an award-winning health system in New Bern, N.C., was one of the first to collaborate with Philips to implement IntelliSpace Enterprise Edition, a comprehensive managed service. Watch the video to see how we collaborated together to streamline workflows and improve interoperability for better care.Watch the related editorial interview VIDEO: Streamlining PACS Administration — Interview with Mike Ciancio, imaging systems administrator at CarolinaEast Health System. Find more SCCT news and videos Technology Reports | April 01, 2018 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017 ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2017 annual meeting.  AI was by far the hottest topic in sessions and on the expo floor at RSNA 2017. Here are links to related deep learning, machine learning coverage:Why AI By Any Name Is Sweet For RadiologyValue in Radiology Takes on Added Depth at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Key Imaging Technology Trends at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Deep Learning is Key Technology Trend at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Machine Learning and the Future of RadiologyVIDEO: Expanding Role for Artificial Intelligence in Medical ImagingHow Artificial Intelligence Will Change Medical Imaging Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Radiation Therapy | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Creating a Low-cost Radiotherapy System for the Developing World Paul Liu, Ph.D., post-doctoral research associate, Image X Institute at the University of Sydney, Australia, explains how his center is working on a low-cost radiation therapy system for the developing world. The Nano-X system will use a fixed linac gantry and rotate the patient around the beam. This would lighten the weight of the system, reduce the need for room shielding, and cut the number iof moving parts to lower costs and ease maintanence. Liu spoke about the project in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Brachytherapy Systems | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: New Alpha Emitter Brachytherapy Seeds in Development Lior Arazi, Ph.D., assistant professor at Ben-Gurion University, Israel, explains the potential benefits of a new Radium-224 brachytherapy seed technology he is helping develop. The technology uses high-dose alpha particles to kill cancer cells, but has a very short tissue penetration, so it can be placed very close to critical structures without causing collateral damage to healthy tissue. He discussed this technology in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Efforts to Define the Roles of Medical Physicists and Assistants for Regulators Brent Parker, Ph.D., DABR, professor of radiation physics and medical physicist at MD Anderson Cancer Center, explains how the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) is creating guidelines to better define the roles of non-physicist assistants. He said there is a lack of state regulatory oversight for medical physicists or their assistants, partly because there are no guidelines from the medical societies. AAPM has created a series of policy statements to better define these the roles and requirements for all of these positions. Parker said the goal is to give state regulators the the definitions needed to create oversight guidelines. He spoke on this topic in sessions at the AAPM 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Videos | Brachytherapy Systems | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: New Alpha Emitter Brachytherapy Seeds in Development Related content:itnTV “Conversations”: The Accuray Philosophy Find more news and videos from AAPM. Related Articles on Y-90 Radiotherapy:Current Advances in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyA Look Ahead in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyRadioactive Bead Therapy Now Used for Head, Neck TumorsNCCN Guidelines Recommend Y-90 Microspheres for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Treatment CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Artificial Intelligence | April 17, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence in Radiology — Are We Doomed? At the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Rasu Shrestha, M.D., MBA, chief strategy officer for Atrium Health, discusses his new role with Atrium, the hype cycle of artificial intelligence (AI) and the key elements of getting AI in radiology — and in healthcare — right.Read the article “Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical Care”Listen to the podcast Is Artificial Intelligence The Doom of Radiology?, a discussion with Shrestha. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Nuclear Imaging | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Utilization of PET For Evaluation of Cardiac Sarcoidosis Raza Alvi, M.D., a research fellow in radiology at Massachusetts General Hospital, has been involved in a study of a positron-emission tomography (PET) FDG radiotracer agent to image sarcoidosis. The inflammatory disease affects multiple organs and usually include abnormal masses or nodules (granulomas) consisting of inflamed tissues that can form in the heart. Alvi presented on this topic at American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting.  Artificial Intelligence | April 02, 2019 itnTV “Conversations:” What is Edison? At RSNA 2018, GE Healthcare formally presented Edison as the company’s new applications platform, designed to speed the delivery of precision care.  Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Related CT Technology Content:New CT Technology Entering the MarketVIDEO: Advances in Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with David Bluemke, M.D.Expanding Applications for Computed TomographyVIDEO: Overview of Cardiac CT Trends and 2019 SCCT Meeting Highlights —Interview with Ron Blankstein, M.D., directVIDEO: 10 Tips to Improve Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with Quynh Truong, M.D.FFR-CT: Is It Radiology or Cardiology?VIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Using Advanced CT to Enhance Radiation Therapy Planning — Interview with Carri Glide-Hurst, Ph.D.VIDEO: Tips and Tricks to Aid Cardiac CT Technologist WorkflowManaging CT Radiation DoseVIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of Most Innovative New Cardiac CT Technology at SCCT 2017New Developments in Cardiovascular Computed Tomography at SCCT 2017VIDEO: Role of Cardiac CT in Value-based Medicine — Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.Advances in Cardiac Imaging Technologies at RSNA 2017VIDEO: The Future of Cardiac CT in the Next Decade — Interview with Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.VIDEO: What to Consider When Comparing 64-slice to Higher Slice CT Systems — Interview with Claudio Smuclovisky, M.D.  Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Find more SCCT news and videos Enterprise Imaging | March 27, 2019 VIDEO: GE Healthcare’s CCA Analytics Provides Governance for Enterprise Imaging GE Healthcare Centricity Clinical Archive (CCA) Analytics, shown at RSNA 2018, works directly with the vendor neutral archive (VNA), allowing users to evaluate clinical, financial and operational processes across the healthcare system. The analytics solution shows how all of the different components of the archive and all of the imaging sources — departments, facilities and modalities — are working across the enterprise. Breast Imaging | April 18, 2019 VIDEO: Age, Interval and Other Considerations for Breast Screening In a keynote lecture at the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Diana Miglioretti, Ph.D., dean’s professor of biostatistics at UC Davis Health, discussed risk-stratified breast cancer screening and its potential to improve the balance of screening benefits to harms by tailoring screening intensity and modality to individual risk factors.Read the article “How Risk Stratification Might Affect Women’s Health”Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement”Watch the VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting Find more SCCT news and videos Digital Pathology | July 11, 2019 VIDEO: Integrating Digital Pathology With Radiology Toby Cornish, M.D., Ph.D., associate professor and medical director of informatics at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, explains how the subspecialty of digital pathology has evolved in recent years, the benefits of integrating pathology and radiology, and how artificial intelligence (AI) may smooth the transition, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting.  Find more SCCT news and videos Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Radiation Oncology View all 91 items Find more news and videos from AAPM. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Technology Reports View all 9 items Artificial Intelligence | July 03, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Assist in Pediatric Imaging Sudhen Desai, M.D., FSIR, interventional radiologist at Texas Children’s Hospital, editor of IR Quarterly for the Society of Interventional Radiology (SIR) and on the Board of Directors for the Society of Physician Entrepreneurs, explained how artificial intelligence (AI) can assist in pediatric imaging and the pitfalls of training AI systems. He spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference. Deep learning algorithms require large amounts of patient case data to train the systems to read medical images automatically without human intervention. However, in pediatrics, there are often much lower numbers of normal and abnormal scans that can be used compared to vast amounts of adult exams available. This makes it difficult to train systems, so AI developers are coming up with innovative new ways to train their software. Compounding issues with training pediatric imaging AI is that the normal ranges change very quickly for young children due to their rapid development. He explained what is normal for a 2-year-old may not be normal for a 5-year-old.Desai and other pediatric physicians who spoke at the conference said AI could have a big impact on pediatric imaging where there are not enough specialists for the increasing image volumes. Mammography | April 15, 2019 VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting Wendie Berg, M.D., Ph.D., FACR, chief scientific advisor to DenseBreast-info.org and professor of radiology at University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine/Magee-Women’s Hospital of UPMC, spoke with ITN Editorial Director Melinda Taschetta-Millane about some of the proposed amendments to the language being used for mammography reporting and quality improvement.Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement” Radiology Business | May 03, 2017 VIDEO: MACRA’s Impact on Cardiology Kim A. Williams, Sr., M.D., chief of cardiology at Rush University Medical Center, Chicago and former president of both the American College of Cardiology (ACC) and the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explains the impact of healthcare reform on cardiology and specifically on nuclear perfusion imaging.  Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology Prem Soman, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at the Heart and Vascular Institute, University of Pittsburgh, and president-elect of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explained advances in PET and SPECT imaging and the learning curve involved in reading scans from the new CZT SPECT cameras. Watch the VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging, an iknterview with David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida. Read the related article “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.” Conference Coverage View all 396 items Radiation Oncology | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of a Fully Self-contained Brain Radiotherapy System Stephen Sorensen, Ph.D., DABR, chief of medical physics, St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center, Phoenix, Arizona, explains the first commercial use of the Zap-X stereotactic radio surgery (SRS) brain radiotherapy system. The system uses a capsule-like shield to surround the gantry and patient, eliminating the need for expensive room build outs requiring vaults. The goal of the system is to expand SRS brain therapy by making it easier and less expensive to acquire the treatment system. Sorensen spoke about this system in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | January 08, 2016 RSNA Technology Report 2015: MRI Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. Below is related MRI content:RSNA Technology Report 2015: Magnetic Resonance ImagingRecent Advances in MRI TechnologySoftware Advances in MRI TechnologyAdvances in Cardiac Imaging at RSNA 2016Recent Trends and Developments in Contrast MediaComparison Chart: MRI Wide Bore Systems (chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: MRI Contrast Agents(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: Cardiovascular MRI Analysis Software(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register) Artificial Intelligence | March 13, 2019 VIDEO: How iCad Uses AI to Speed Breast Tomosynthesis At RSNA 2018, iCad showed how its ProFound AI for digital breast tomosynthesis technology might help in the interpretation of tomosynthesis exams. Rodney Hawkins, vice president of marketing for iCad, discusses how this technology can better help detect the cancer.Related content:Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AIRSNA 2018 Sunday – Improving, Not Replacing AAPM | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic Computed Tomography (CT) Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering, and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains the “building bridges” theme of the 2019 AAPM meeting. This theme was the focus of her president’s address at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She spoke on the theme of diversity and how to break down the barriers between various minorities, male-female, religion, national origin, etc. She gave many photo examples of how we pigeon hole people into neat categories and that we often say we have equally in society, however her images showed recent images of big political summits where there are no women present, or they were the secretaries in the background. She said in medical practice, department administration and collaboration on projects, people need to be cognoscente of bias they have engrained by culture for which they may not even be aware.She showed a slide of the AAPM membership makeup by generation and said members need to keep in mind the way each generation thinks and communicates varies by their generation’s life experience and upbringing. McCollough said understanding these differences can help bridge perceived gaps in communication. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: Implementing CZT SPECT Cardiac Protocols to Reduce Radiation Dose Randy Thompson, M.D., attending cardiologist, St. Luke’s Mid-America Heart Institute, Kansas City, explains protocols and what to consider when working with the newer generation CZT-SPECT camera systems for nuclear cardiology. He spoke during the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today technology update meeting. Watch the related VIDEO “PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology.” Read the related articles “Managing Dose in PET and SPECT Myocardial Perfusion Imaging,”  and “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.” Artificial Intelligence | January 15, 2019 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2018 In Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AI, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence (AI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting. Cardio-oncology | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Characterization of Cardiac Structural Changes and Function Following Radiation Therapy Magid Awadalla, MBBS, is an advanced cardiac imaging research fellow at Massachusetts General Hospital. He has been involved in an imaging study of cardiac changes from photon radiotherapy in breast cancer patients using serial cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The radiotherapy beams used to treat breast cancer pass close to the neighboring heart, which can cause cardiac cell damage leading to issues like heart failure later on. He spoke on the topic of cardio-oncology at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Technology Report: Digital Radiography Systems Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of digital radiography (DR) advances at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2016 meeting. Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch a technology report sidebar video on new DR Systems technology. Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Related Enterprise Imaging Content:RSNA Technology Report 2017: Enterprise ImagingVIDEO: Building An Effective Enterprise Imaging StrategyFive Steps for Better Diagnostic Image ManagementVIDEO: Enterprise Imaging and the Digital Imaging Adoption ModelEnterprise Imaging to Account for 27 Percent of Imaging MarketVIDEO: Defining Enterprise Imaging — The HIMSS-SIIM Enterprise Imaging WorkgroupVIDEO: How to Build An Enterprise Imaging System Lior Arazi, Ph.D., assistant professor at Ben-Gurion University, Israel, explains the potential benefits of a new Radium-224 brachytherapy seed technology he is helping develop. The technology uses high-dose alpha particles to kill cancer cells, but has a very short tissue penetration, so it can be placed very close to critical structures without causing collateral damage to healthy tissue. He discussed this technology in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Information Technology View all 220 items Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 10:06Loaded: 0.00%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -10:06 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. 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Enterprise Imaging | July 09, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 2 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy.Watch part 1 of the interview at the 2019 Society for Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) conference. Computed Tomography (CT) | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: New Advances in CT Imaging Technology Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic CT Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), shares her insights on the latest advances in computed tomography (CT) imaging technology. She spoke at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She also did an interview at AAPM on her president’s theme for the 2019 meeting – VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care.Find more news and videos from AAPM.last_img read more

Looking Back on Three Decades With David Stevens

first_imgLooking Back on Three Decades With David Stevens David Stevens MBA mortgage Mortgage Bankers Association mortgage servicing National Mortgage Servicing Conference and Expo 2018-02-07 David Wharton in Daily Dose, Headlines, journal, News, Servicing Sharecenter_img February 7, 2018 726 Views With the National Mortgage Servicing Conference and Expo 2018 unfolding this week in Grapevine, Texas, MReport has been on the scene, speaking with some of the industry’s biggest names and power players.During the event, MReport spoke on the phone with David Stevens, President and CEO of the Mortgage Bankers Association. With over 30 years in mortgage finance, Stevens has held senior positions at Wells Fargo and Freddie Mac, as well as serving as Federal Housing Administration commissioner during the Obama Administration. Having served as CEO of the MBA since 2011, last October Stevens announced his plans to step down as head of the trade organization, following a battle against stage 4 cancer. Stevens plans to hand over the reins of the MBA on September 30, 2018.Looking back over his three decades in the industry, Stevens points to his time as FHA commissioner as one of the highlights of his career. “That was a unique experience, and one where the FHA commissioner played a much larger role than typically happens, where I got to meet with the President with relative frequency and help form policy.”For his final year at the head of the MBA, Stevens says his focus will be on keeping “the membership confident and engaged” and on working with members of Congress such as Sen. Bob Corker (R-Tennessee) and Rep. Jeb Hensarling (R-Texas) on GSE reform. “We’re all leaving at the end of the year, and all three of us have spoken with each other about trying to see if we can get this over the goal line,” Stevens said.When asked what qualities will be key for whoever succeeds him as head of the MBA, Stevens first cites diverse experience within the industry. “I’ve been able to experience the industry and operate large organizations inside of it for a long time, and that gave me an understanding of what the issues are, and the ability to quickly comprehend the impacts of any proposed changes,” Stevens said. “Industry knowledge is key.”He also says that an understanding of how the political system works is crucial. “I worked on developing policies and pursuing them, not just in the public arena, but with members of Congress on both sides, and had them push budget initiatives and more,” Stevens recalled. “So I got to not only know the members of Congress, but I got to understand how the process works, and that’s been an invaluable resource to be in my role here.”Stay tuned this week, as MReport will continue bringing you more conversations with mortgage and servicing leaders.last_img read more