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Kent has own comfort zone

first_img“Whatever my legacy is, that’s something I can’t control. If you ask one person, you’ll get one answer. If you ask another person, you’ll probably get a different answer.” And if that one person you ask is Kent himself? “Probably a couple of things,” he said. “One is that I never cheated at the game, ever. And the other is that I did my job and I did it right. My mom and dad taught me that if you do a job, do it right. Don’t do it half(way).” Any other questions? Brian Sabean and Ned Colletti had a few. That was back in the fall of 1996, when Sabean, the general manager of the San Francisco Giants, and Colletti, then his top assistant, were considering trading longtime Bay Area fan favorite Matt Williams to Cleveland. The key player coming back would be Kent, an infielder long on potential who hadn’t quite measured up to it yet. The due diligence of Sabean and Colletti included a phone call to Dallas Green, who had managed Kent in New York before the Mets traded him to the Indians at the previous season’s trading deadline. “Dallas told me if we were looking for a social butterfly, somebody to stand on tables and be rah-rah and take everybody to dinner, we should look somewhere else,” said Colletti, now the Dodgers’ general manager. “But he said if we were looking for somebody who would play this game hard day in and day out, who would always strive to be better, who would be bitter in defeat and would try every single day to figure out how to win a ballgame, then this was our guy.” By the time Colletti was hired to run the Dodgers in the fall of 2005, Kent already was here. And it was Colletti who decided to sign Kent to a $11.5 million contract extension. Kent knows there are many opinions floating around about him, and he also knows it is way too late to change most of them. But he operates on the belief that he is answerable only to his family, his teammates and the organization for which he plays. “I have been criticized for being quiet, moody, selfish, arrogant, just a ton of things,” Kent said. “But I don’t think any of that has been detrimental to my game. I think everyone in this clubhouse should be arrogant and cocky and confident. It’s just another aspect of what a ballplayer should be.” tony.jackson@dailynews.com (818) 713-3607 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! VERO BEACH, Fla. – It was a little past noon, and the Dodgers’ spring training clubhouse was bustling. A few players were trickling in from the back fields, but most were well into their showers or lunches or whatever they happened to be watching on the various televisions hanging from the ceiling. Jeff Kent, meanwhile, sat silently in front of his corner locker several yards away from his teammates. Having already tossed his uniform into a nearby laundry bin, Kent wore only a blue and white T-shirt and blue shorts. His legs were crossed, his head was bowed and the trademark motorcycle magazine resting on his lap was open to a page he found far more interesting than anything going on in the room. This is Kent at his most comfortable, two weeks shy of his 39th birthday and possibly five weeks shy of kicking off his final six months as a professional baseball player. center_img Is he left undisturbed out of respect, because of all he has accomplished in this game and because of his status as an almost certain Hall of Famer? Or has his notorious and well-chronicled aloofness simply left him without many friends on this team? There is no real answer to that question. No matter how many people might want to stick definitive labels on him, the bottom line is Kent is completely comfortable in his own skin. Kent, a five-time All-Star and the most prolific power-hitting second baseman of all time, prides himself on a lot of things, like his professionalism and the fact that, unlike Barry Bonds, he never has been suspected of messing with the game’s integrity. But mostly, the most misunderstood man on this Dodgers team and possibly in all of baseball prides himself on, well, being misunderstood. “In the 15-plus years that I have played this game, I have had some good years and some bad years, both professionally and personally,” Kent said. “My game has changed over the years, and so has my personality. last_img read more

Antelope Valley Calendar

first_img Al-Anon will host a discussion, 1 p.m. at 1737 E. Ave. R, Palmdale; a step study at 7 p.m. at 1827 E. Ave. Q-10, Palmdale; and a meeting on Steps, Traditions, Concepts at 7:30 p.m. at 44815 Fig Ave., Suite 101, Lancaster. Call (661) 274-9353 or (800) 344-2666. Emotions Anonymous will meet, 7-8:30 p.m. Information and location: (661) 723-9967. Desert Aire Women’s Golf Association will meet at Desert Aire Golf Course at Avenue P and 40th Street East in Palmdale. Call (661) 269-5982. Cardio Knockout Blast, a workout for seniors, 8-9 a.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Bring a floor mat. Call (661) 267-5551. Billiard Gang for seniors, 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5551. Take Off Pounds Sensibly will meet, 9-10:30 a.m. Call (661) 272-0207 or (661) 947-7672. Sierra Club will offer one- to two-hour conditioning hikes leaving at 6 p.m. from the Palmdale Park and Ride lot, Avenue S at Antelope Valley Freeway. Moderately conditioned beginning hikers are welcome. Call (661) 273-2761. Country line dance lessons for seniors, 1-2 p.m. for beginners and 2:15 p.m. for intermediate dancers at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Donation requested. Call (661) 267-5551. Soroptimist International of Antelope Valley will meet, noon at the Holiday Inn of Palmdale-Lancaster, 38630 5th St. W., Palmdale. Business and professional women are invited. Call (661) 946-1609. Compulsive Eaters Anonymous – HOW Concept will meet, 5:30 p.m. at the Larry Chimbole Cultural Center, 38530 Sierra Highway, Palmdale. Call (661) 274-4178. Take Off Pounds Sensibly, Chapter 569 will meet, 6:30 p.m. at Grecian Isles Mobile Home Park, 4444 E. Ave. R, Palmdale. Call (661) 947-7672 or (661) 285-5003. Overeaters Anonymous will meet, 7:30-9 p.m. Step Workbook reading and writing. Call (661) 947-7935. Hotline: (661) 789-5806. Support group for women in abusive or battering situations will meet, 1-3:30 p.m. and 6-8 p.m. A Spanish-language group also will meet, 10 a.m.-noon. Call (661) 945-6736 or (661) 945-5509. Narcotics Anonymous: For meeting times and locations, call (661) 266-2200 or check www.sava-na.com. FRIDAY J&J Social and Travel Club will host a potluck and games social, 7 p.m. in Lancaster. Bring a main or side dish, salad or dessert to share and a beverage. Call (661) 267-2586 or (661) 946-5222. AV Scrap Club will hold a Super Scrapbook Crop Night, 6-11 at the Palmdale Holiday Inn, 38630 5th St. W., Palmdale. Printer, computers, scrapbook software, sewing machines and other tools will be available. Cost: $25, which includes food and beverages. Call (661) 273-7925. AV Scrap Club will hold scrapbook basics classes, 10 a.m. and noon at the Larry Chimbole Cultural Center, 38350 Sierra Highway, Palmdale. Cost: $5 per class. Register at (661) 273-7925 or AVScrapClub.com. Fun After 40 Ballroom Dance Club will host ballroom dancing, 7:30-10 p.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12. Dance lessons: 6:30-7:30 p.m. Dance admission: $2 for club members, $4 for nonmembers. Dance lessons: $2. Call (661) 943-0210 or 267-5551. Grief Support Group will meet, 10-11:30 a.m. at Lancaster Presbyterian Church, 1661 W. Lancaster Blvd., Lancaster. Call (661) 951-2988. Celebrate Recovery will meet, 7 p.m. at the Harvest Office and Ministry Center, 43209 10th St. W., Lancaster. Call (661) 942-2803. Speakers in the Wind Toastmasters will meet, noon-1 p.m. at the Larry Chimbole Cultural Center, 38350 Sierra Highway, Palmdale. Call Jack Knight at (661) 946-7166. Adult Anger Management Group will meet, 6:30-8 p.m. Court approved. Call (661) 266-8700. Low-cost Facilitated Parenting Group will meet, 10-11:30 a.m. Court approved. Call (661) 266-8700. Successful Marriage and Parenting course, 10 a.m.-noon. Call Carmen Andersen at (661) 273-8122. MOPS (Mothers of Preschoolers) meets, 9:15 a.m.-noon the first and third Fridays of each month at Church of Christ, 1655 E. Lancaster Blvd., Lancaster. Includes a hot breakfast buffet, discussion groups, featured speaker, craft and demonstrations. Children welcome. Cost: $5 for moms and $3 for kids. Call (661) 943-3162 or (661) 942-1638. Stress Management will meet, 1 p.m. at 43423 Division St., Suite 107, Lancaster. Call (661) 947-1595 or (661) 726-2850, Ext. 221. Speakers in the Wind Toastmaster Club 2867 will meet, noon-1 p.m. at the Larry Chimbole Cultural Center, 38350 Sierra Highway, Palmdale. Call Joyce Hall at (661) 946-1181 or Barbara Linde at (661) 947-2537. Take Off Pounds Sensibly will meet, 9-10:30 a.m. Call (661) 272-0207 or (661) 947-7672. Celebrate Recovery, a biblically based 12-step recovery program, will meet, 7 p.m. at First Baptist Church, 44648 15th St. W. Call Pastor Pat Tanner at (661) 948-0855. The Lightkeepers, Spiritual Discussion Group, will meet, 7:30 p.m. at Center of Light, A.V. Church, 1030 West Ave. L-8, Lancaster. Call (661) 718-8731. Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 3000 and Ladies Auxiliary will serve steak or shrimp dinners, 5:30-8 p.m. at 4342 W. Ave. L, Quartz Hill. Takeout orders. Proceeds will go to community affairs. Members, guests and public welcome. Call (661) 943-2225. Meditation class, 7-8:30 p.m. For location and information, call (661) 945-9832. Schizophrenics Anonymous will meet, 6:30-8 p.m. in the multipurpose room on the mental health ward at Antelope Valley Hospital, 1600 W. Ave. J, Lancaster. Call Bill Slocum at (661) 947-1595 or (661) 319-5101. The Ups and Downs, a support group for people who have been diagnosed with bipolar disorder or depression, will meet, 2 p.m. at the Antelope Valley Friendship Center, 43423 Division St. Suite 107, Lancaster. Call Bill Slocum at (661) 947-1595 or (661) 319-5101. The Kaiser Permanente Grief Support Group will meet, 10-11:30 a.m. at the clinic offices, 44444 20th St. W., Lancaster. Open to the community. Free. Call (661) 951-2988. The Weekenders, a social and recreational group for mental health consumers, will meet, 1-2 p.m. at Antelope Valley Discovery Center, 1609 E. Palmdale Blvd., Palmdale. Call (661) 947-1595. Al-Anon will have a 12-and-12 meeting at 10:30 a.m. at 1821 W. Lancaster Blvd. and a beginners meeting at 7 p.m. at 1737 E. Ave. R, Room 104, Palmdale. Call (661) 274-9353 or (800) 344-2666. Pinochle Group for seniors, 6-9 p.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5551. Flex and stretch, a workout for seniors, 8-9 a.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Bring floor mat and hand weights. Call (661) 267-5551. Billiard Gang for seniors, 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5551. Oil painting class for seniors, 9-11 a.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5551. Shop Talk Toastmasters will meet, 7-8:30 a.m. at Crazy Otto’s Diner. Call Stan Main at (661) 269-1424. Take Off Pounds Sensibly, Chapter 1681 will meet, 9:30-11 a.m. in Room 14 at Lancaster United Methodist Church, 918 W. Ave. J, Lancaster. Call (661) 943-4459. Rosamond Moose Lodge, 1105 Sierra Highway, Rosamond, will serve dinner, 5-8 p.m. Cost: $4-$6. Bingo will start at 10 a.m., offered by the Knights of Columbus, 719 W. Ave. M, Lancaster. Overeaters Anonymous will meet, 6:30-7:30 p.m. at Lancaster United Methodist Church, 918 W. Ave. J, Room 13, Lancaster. Call (661) 943-0595. Hotline: (661) 789-5806. Narcotics Anonymous: For meeting times and locations, call (661) 266-2200 or check www.sava-na.org. SATURDAY J&J Social and Travel Club will host a pre-Valentine potluck and dance party, 7 p.m. in Palmdale. Bring a main or side dish, salad or dessert to share and a beverage. Call (661) 267-2586 or (661) 266-9126. AV Scrap Club will sponsor Children’s Scrapbook Day for children ages 7 to 13, 11:30-2:30 p.m. at Larry Chimbole Cultural Center, 38350 Sierra Highway, Palmdale. Bring five photos. Scrapbook kit is included in the $10 fee. Register at (661) 273-7925 or at AVScrapClub.com. Seniors Lunch-Bingo Hour, noon-5 p.m. the fourth Saturday of each month at the Antelope Valley Senior Center, 777 W. Jackman St., Lancaster. Sponsored by Buklod ng Pagkakaisa (Bond of Unity). Call Emerita Ross at (661) 723-7876 or Marie Cabrera at (661) 726-5309. Al-Anon will have a Spanish-speaking discussion meeting, 9 a.m. at 38345 30th St. E., Suite C-3, Palmdale. Call (661) 274-9353. Facilitated Anger Management Group for ages 8-11 will meet, 2:30-4 p.m.; teens, 4:30-6 p.m., and adults, 10:30-noon or 12:30-2 p.m. at the Family Resource Foundation, 38345 30th St. E., Suite A-2, Palmdale. Call (661) 266-8700 or (800) 479-CARE or visit the Web site: www.frf.av.org. Beginning yoga, 9-10 a.m. at Unity Church of Antelope Valley, 39149 8th St. E., Palmdale. Call (661) 273-3341. Women and Self-esteem support group meets in the Acton area. Call (661) 947-0839. Healing Heart support group will meet, 4-5:30 p.m. at the Salvation Army store, 45001 Beech Ave. in Lancaster. Call (661) 943-5830. Compulsive Eaters Anonymous – HOW Concept will meet, 9 a.m. at St. Stephen’s Lutheran Church, 1737 E. Ave. R, Palmdale. Call Jane at (661) 945-4798. Women Midlife Transition Support Group for women over age 40 is facilitated by a professional psychotherapist. Call (661) 947-0839. Overeaters Anonymous will meet, 10-11:30 a.m. in Room 13 at Lancaster United Methodist Church, 918 W. Ave. J, Lancaster. Call (661) 724-1820. Hotline: (661) 789-5806. Narcotics Anonymous: For meeting times and locations, call (661) 266-2200 or check www.todayna.com or www.sava-na.org. SUNDAY Nicotine Anonymous will meet, 8-9 p.m. at Seventh-day Adventist Church, 43824 30th St. W., Lancaster. Call (661) 946-7606. Buklod ng Pagkakaisa (Bond of Unity) Seniors’ Social Hour, 4-7 p.m. the first Sunday of each month at the Antelope Valley Senior Center, 777 W. Jackman St., Lancaster. Meetings feature films, talks, singalongs, talent shows and dancing. Call (661) 723-7876 or (661) 726-5309. Costume Figure Sessions, 2:30-5:30 p.m. the fourth Sunday of each month at Cedar Centre Hall, 44857 Cedar Ave. Cost: $5, students with identification are admitted free. 40 and Up Singles dance, 6:30-10:30 p.m. Sunday at Lancaster Elks Lodge, 240 E. Ave. K, Lancaster. Admission: $5 members, $7 nonmembers. Call (661) 949-9467 or 723-4891. Life Figure Sessions, 2:30-5:30 p.m. the second Sunday of each month at Cedar Centre Hall, 44857 Cedar Ave. Cost: $5, students with ID are admitted free. Teen Care and Support Group, for teens who have lost a family member or friend, will meet, 6:30 p.m. at Desert Vineyard Christian School, 1011 E. Ave. I, Room 302, Lancaster. Call (661) 945-2777. Palmdale Moose Lodge, 3101 E. Ave. Q, Palmdale, will host bingo games beginning at 1 p.m. Call (661) 947-6777. Revealing Truth, a meditation and spiritual discussion, 4:45-6:15 p.m. Call (661) 723-9967. Antelope Valley Chess Club will meet, 1-5 p.m. at American Legion Post 771, 39463 10th St. E., Palmdale. Call (661) 726-1323. Narcotics Anonymous: For meeting times and locations, call (661) 266-2200 or check www.sava-na.org. Overeaters Anonymous will meet, 5-6 p.m. at 44960 Cedar Ave., Lancaster. Call (661) 789-5806. MONDAY Beyond the Light, a socialization and support group for young adults, ages 17 to 25, with mental health issues, will meet, noon-1 p.m. at Transitional Youth Services, 104 E. Ave. K-4, Lancaster. Call Bill Slocum (661) 947-1595. Jazzercise classes, 5:30-6:30 p.m. at George Lane Park, 5520 W. Ave. L-8, Quartz Hill. Call (661) 722-7780. Snyders Dance Groove will give ballroom, Latin, country and swing dance lessons, 6-8:30 p.m. at the Antelope Valley Senior Center, 777 W. Jackman St., Lancaster. For ages 40 and up. Cost: $3 per person. Call (661) 609-6510. Take Off Pounds Sensibly will meet, 9-10:30 a.m. Call (661) 272-0207 or (661) 947-7672. Co-Dependents Anonymous Step Study will meet, 6-7 p.m. at Antelope Valley Hospital, multipurpose meeting room, second floor, 1600 W. Ave. J, Lancaster. Call (661) 944-4927. 12 Step Recovery Groups for alcohol and drug addiction, co-dependency, relationship addiction, overeating, fear and anxiety issues, meets, 7 p.m. at Desert Vineyard Christian Fellowship, 1011 E. Ave. I, Lancaster. Call (661) 945-2777. The Palmdale Elks Lodge, 2705 E. Ave. Q, Palmdale, will host bingo at 5:30 p.m. The grill will be open. Call (661) 947-2027. Overeaters Anonymous will meet, 6-7 p.m. at Lancaster United Methodist Church, 918 W. Ave. J, Lancaster. Call (661) 722-0393. Co-Dependents Anonymous will host a 12-step recovery program, 7:30-9 p.m., at Antelope Valley Hospital, multipurpose meeting room, second floor, 1600 W. Ave. J, Lancaster. Call (661) 944-4927 or (661) 946-5846. Grief Recovery Outreach Group will meet, 6:30-8 p.m. at Family Resource Foundation, 38345 30th St. E., Suite A-2, Palmdale. Call (661) 266-8700 or visit www.frf.av.org. Adult Anger Management Group will meet, 6:30-8 p.m. at Family Resource Foundation, 38345 30th St. E., Suite A-2, Palmdale. Call (661) 266-8700. The Highs and Lows, a support group for those diagnosed with manic depression or related disorders, will meet, 7-9 p.m. at Lutheran Church of the Master, 725 E. Ave. J, Lancaster. Al-Anon will have a discussion, 7 p.m. at 51st Street West and Avenue K, Lancaster. Child care provided. Call (661) 274-9353 or (800) 344-2666. Take Off Pounds Sensibly Chapter 572 will meet, 9-11 a.m. at the Mayflower Gardens chapel, 6570 W. Ave. L-12, Quartz Hill. Call (661) 943-3089. Early bird bingo games will begin at 6 p.m. with regular games beginning at 6:30 p.m. at the Palmdale Elks Lodge, 2705 E. Ave. Q, Palmdale. Call (661) 947-2027. Early bird bingo games will begin at 6:30 p.m. with regular games beginning at 7 p.m. at Paraclete High School, 42145 30th St. W., Lancaster. Call (661) 943-3255, Monday evenings: (661) 943-1017. Billiard Gang for seniors will meet, 9:15 a.m.-4 p.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5551. Flex and stretch, a workout for seniors, 8-9 a.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Bring a floor mat and hand weights. Call (661) 267-5551. Parent support group will meet, 6:30-8 p.m. at Family Resource Foundation, 1529 E. Palmdale Blvd., Suite 203, Palmdale. The facilitated group is for parents who need help coping with family issues. Call (661) 266-8700. Compulsive Eaters Anonymous – HOW Concept will meet, 6 p.m. at the Larry Chimbole Cultural Center, 38530 Sierra Highway, Palmdale. Call (661) 273-1016. Expectant parents can tour the Antelope Valley Hospital obstetrics department, 1600 W. Ave. J in Lancaster, and get information on what to expect during hospitalization, at sessions starting at 6 p.m. Visitors meet in the main lobby. Narcotics Anonymous: For meeting times and locations, call (661) 266-2200 or check www.sava-na.org. TUESDAY J&J Social and Travel Club will meet for its weekly league bowling, 6-8 p.m. at Sands Bowl, 43323 Sierra Highway, Lancaster. Call (661) 267-2586. Business Network International B2 Bombers chapter will meet, 12:15 p.m. at Eduardo’s restaurant, 819 W. Palmdale Blvd., Palmdale. Call (661) 609-1288 or e-mail audmill@qnet.com. The organization’s Web site is at www.bni-scav.com. Prostate Cancer Support Group meets, 12:30 p.m. the third Tuesday of each month at Lutheran Church of the Master, 725 E. Ave. J, Lancaster. Call Susan Baker at (661) 273-2200. Toddler story time for children ages 2-6, 9:30 and 11:30 a.m. at Barnes & Noble, 39228 10th St. W., Palmdale. Call (661) 272-9134. Celebrate Discovery, a Christian-based 12-step program, will meet, 6:30 p.m. at Palmdale United Methodist Church, 39055 10th St. W., Palmdale. Call (661) 947-3103. Jazzercise classes, 5:30-6:30 p.m. at George Lane Park, 5520 W. Ave. L-8 in Quartz Hill. Call (661) 722-7780. Lupus International Support Group meets, 6:30-8 p.m. the second Tuesday of each month in Palmdale. Call Danielle Duffey at (888) 532-2322, Ext. 4. Successful Anger Management course, 7-9 p.m. in Lancaster. Call (661) 538-1846. Sand Creek Orators, Toastmaster International meets, 7:30 p.m. the second and fourth Tuesdays of each month at Hummel Hall, 2200 20th St. W., Rosamond. Call Miik Miller at (661) 256-0328. Caregiver Support Group will meet, 5:30-7 p.m. in Conference Room 1 at Lancaster Community Hospital in Lancaster. Sponsored by ProCare Hospice. Call (661) 951-1146. Tears in My Heart Support Group will meet, 10:30 a.m.-noon and 5:30-7 p.m. at ProCare Hospice, 42442 10th St. W., Suite D, Lancaster. Call (661) 951-1146. Rocketeers Toastmasters meets, 1:30 p.m. the second and fourth Tuesdays of each month at the Air Force Research Laboratory. Call Pam Raneri (661) 275-5287. Pancho Barnes Composite Squadron 49, Civil Air Patrol, will meet, 6-8:30 p.m. at Rosamond Sky Park, 4171 Knox Ave., Rosamond. Call (760) 373-5771. Antelope Valley Archaeology Club will meet, 9:30-11 a.m. at the Larry Chimbole Cultural Center, 38350 Sierra Highway, Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5656. Grief Support Group will meet, 5:30-7 p.m. at the Hoffmann Hospice, 1832 W. Ave. K, Suite D-1. Call (661) 948-8801. Toastmasters Sand Creek Orators Club will meet, 7:30 p.m. the second and fourth Tuesdays of each month at 2500 Orange St., Rosamond. Call Miik Miller at (661) 256-0328. Take Off Pounds Sensibly will meet, 9-10:30 a.m. Call (661) 272-0207 or (661) 947-7672. Snyders Dance Groove meets, 6-8:30 p.m. the first and second Tuesdays of each month at the Antelope Valley Senior Center, 777 W. Jackman St., Lancaster. Cost: $2. Call (661) 609-6510. Mothers of Preschoolers (MOPS) meets, 9-11:30 a.m. the second and fourth Tuesdays of each month for brunch, speakers and crafts at Central Christian Church, 3131 W. Ave. J, Lancaster. Cost: $6 per meeting, plus $2 per child for child care. Scholarships are available. Call (661) 945-7902. 12 Step Recovery Group for alcohol and drug addiction will meet, 7 p.m. at Desert Vineyard Christian Fellowship, 1011 E. Ave. I, Lancaster. Call (661) 945-2777. American Indian Little League will meet, 7 p.m. at HomeTown Buffet, 422 W. Ave. P. Call Harry Richard at (661) 267-2259. High Desert Woodworkers Club meets, 6:30 p.m. the first Tuesday of each month at Denny’s restaurant, 2005 W. Ave. K, Lancaster. Call (760) 240-4705. Grief/Bereavement Group will meet, 10 a.m. and 5:30 p.m. at ProCare Hospice, 42442 10th St. W., Suite D, Lancaster. Call (661) 951-1146. Youth Anger Management Group for ages 8-11 will meet, 6:30-8 p.m. at Family Resource Foundation, 38345 30th St. E., Suite A-2, Palmdale. Call (661) 266-8700 or (800) 479-CARE, or visit the Web site: www.frf.av.org. Plane Talk Toastmasters will meet, noon-1 p.m. at the Lockheed Federal Credit Union, 1011 Lockheed Way, Palmdale. Call (661) 572-4123. Harmony Showcase Chorus of Sweet Adelines International will rehearse, 7:30 p.m. at 44857 Cedar Ave., Lancaster. The group is part of an international organization of women who sing four-part harmony. Call (661) 273-0995, (661) 285-1797 or (661) 940-3109. Al-Anon will hold a discussion, noon at 1737 E. Ave. R, Room 104, Palmdale, and at 7 p.m. at the Larry Chimbole Cultural Center, Room 704, Palmdale. Call (661) 274-9353 or (800) 344-2666. Cardio Knockout Blast, a workout for seniors, 8-9 a.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Bring a floor mat. Call (661) 267-5551. Billiards Gang for seniors, 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5551. Health Insurance Counseling and Advocacy Program representative will be available, 1-3 p.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5551 for an appointment. Tumbleweed Card Club for seniors will play canasta, pinochle and other games, 1-4:30 p.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5551. Line dancing, 6-7 p.m. for beginners and 7-8:30 p.m. for intermediate dancers at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5551. Palmdale Youth Council will meet, 5:30 p.m. at the Palmdale Parks and Recreation office, 38260 10th St. E., Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5611. Sierra Club will offer one- to two-hour conditioning hikes leaving at 6 p.m. from the Palmdale Park and Ride lot, Avenue S at the Antelope Valley Freeway. Moderately conditioned beginning hikers are welcome. Call (661) 273-2761. Expectant parent tours of the Antelope Valley Hospital obstetrics department will start at 6 p.m. from the hospital lobby, 1600 W. Ave. J, Lancaster. Overeaters Anonymous will meet, 7-9 p.m. at Our Savior Lutheran Church, 1821 W. Lancaster Blvd., Lancaster. Beginners will meet at 7 p.m. Call (661) 948-2571. Hotline: (661) 789-5806. Compulsive Eaters Anonymous – HOW Concept will meet, 10:30 a.m. at the Larry Chimbole Cultural Center, 38530 Sierra Highway, Palmdale. Call (661) 274-4178. Also in Lancaster, 6:30 p.m. at Sunnydale School, 1233 W. Ave. J-8. Call Karen at (661) 723-9331. Overeaters Anonymous – HOW Concept! will meet, 7:15 p.m. at Robin’s Law Office, 203 W. Ave. J, Lancaster. Call (661) 949-9192. Narcotics Anonymous: For meeting times and locations, call (661) 266-2200 or check www.sava-na.com. 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! TODAY Ask and It is Given classes, 6:30-8 p.m., Stress Management Institute for Living Empowered, 44130 Division St., Lancaster. Call (661) 942-4220. High Desert Toastmasters will meet, 7-8:30 p.m. at 1008 W. Ave. M-4, Palmdale. Call (661) 992-3229 or 944-1130. High Desert Modular Model Railroad Club meets, 7 p.m. the second Thursday of each month in the Experimental Test Pilots Association boardroom, 44814 Elm Ave., Lancaster. Call Bob Drury at (661) 400-4479. Cedar Open Reading meets weekly, 7-9 p.m. in Cedar Hall, 44851 Cedar Ave., Lancaster, except on the second Thursday of the month when the meeting is in the gallery, 44857 Cedar Ave., Lancaster. Call (661) 943-4314. AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MORESanta Anita opens winter meet Saturday with loaded card The Overcomers, an emotional and educational support group for mental health consumers, will meet, 6:30 p.m. at the Antelope Valley Discovery Center, 1609 E. Palmdale Blvd., Suite G. Call Bill Slocum or Mary Rogers at (661) 947-1595 or (661) 319-5101. Aces & Deuces Square Dance Club will meet, 7-8:15 p.m. for beginners and 8:15-9:30 p.m. for plus at Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale, for ages 10 and up. Cost: $3. Call (661) 256-7650. Grief/Bereavement Group will meet, 10 a.m. at ProCare Hospice, 42442 10th St. W., Suite D, Lancaster. Call (661) 951-1146. The Ups and Downs, a support group for people with bipolar disorder or depression, will meet, 2 p.m. at the Antelope Valley Discovery Center, 1609 E. Palmdale Blvd., Suite G, Palmdale. Call Bill Slocum at (661) 947-1595 or (661) 319-5101. Facilitated Anger Management Group for teens will meet, 4:30-6 p.m., and adults will meet, 6:30-8 p.m., at Family Resource Foundation, 38345 30th St. E., Suite A-2, Palmdale. Call (661) 266-8700 or (800) 479-CARE or visit the Web site: www.frf.av.org. last_img read more

Who are England’s World Cup penalty shootout takers? Five names revealed

first_img 6 England Player Penalty Records At the 2014 World Cup and Euro 2016, England had already been eliminated in more humiliating circumstances before they had the chance to participate in a penalty showdown.However now, with a wave of carefree optimism behind the team, Gareth Southgate’s men are again at the stage of a major tournament where they could encounter this scenario.According to the Sun, five players have volunteered ahead of time and confirmed that they will be taking the spot kicks if needed.They are as follows… Harry Kane scored two emphatic penalties against Panama 6 1. Ashley Young 6 6 3. Jordan Henderson It is also claimed that Jamie Vardy and Marcus Rashford will take penalties if they have been substituted on to the field ahead of the shootout.center_img 2. Harry Kane England have reportedly decided who their five penalty takers will be, should one of their World Cup knockout games go to a penalty shootout.The Three Lions were last forced to take spot kicks at Euro 2012, when they succumbed to Italy. 6 4. Jesse Lingard 5. Kieran Trippier getty Young – 5/7 (71 per cent)Kane – 22/26 (85 per cent)Henderson – 1/1 (100 per cent)Lingard – 0/0 (N/A)Trippier – 0/1 (0 per cent) 6last_img read more

DD LOCAL: DUNKINEELY COMMUNITY GEARING UP FOR FESTIVAL

first_imgDunkineely NotesWALKING GROUP – Meets every Tuesday morning at 10:00 am for a walk or stroll of about 30 – 40 minutes with a cup of tea afterwards if you want.All are welcome to join this group. Contact Marie Hutchinson or the Dunkineely Community Limited Office if you are interested: 074 9737678. MC INTYRE’S BAR – Every Wednesday night have Traditional music from 10:00 pm, also Traditional music session in McIntyre’s Bar, Dunkineely on Sunday afternoon at 5pm.All musicians and singers welcome.THE DUNKINEELY MONTESSORI – Are still currently enrolling for September 2014. Both ECCE places available and also mornings. Call Joanne or Sinead on: 087 3814655A MEETING – Of the DCL Dunkineely, Killaghtee and Bruckless Festival sub-committee will take place on Thursday 10th July at 8pm at Dunkineely Community Limited office (The Manse, Dunkineely). All welcome. DUNKINEELY/KILLAGHTEE/BRUCKLESS FESTIVAL – Are having an “Open Photography Competition”.Senior Photography, CLASS 1 Humorous Photography, CLASS 2 Landscape i.e Sea or Land, CLASS 3 Portrait i.e Person or Animal, CLASS 4 Best Filter i.e Smart Phone Photos. €5.00 per entry.Place your Name, Address and Contact number on the reverse of the photograph clearly marking the CLASS you want to enter. Closing date is Thursday 24th July.Post your entries to Dunkineely Community Limited’s Office, Main Street Dunkineely, or just drop them into the DCL Office.Keep a look out on Dunkineely Community Limited’s Facebook page. Dunkineely/Killaghtee/Bruckless Festival – are also having an “Open Art Competition”, Categories include: LANDSCAPE, PORTRAIT, SKETCH OR DRAWING. €5.00 per entry. Place your Name, Address and Contact number on the reverse of the photograph clearly marking the CLASS you want to enter.Closing date is Thursday 31st July. Post your entries to Dunkineely Community Limited’s Office, Main Street Dunkineely, or just drop them into the DCL Office.Keep a look out on Dunkineely Community Limited’s Facebook page.DUNKINEELY IN BLOOM – This competition will brighten up the town and surrounding area. From St John’s Point to Croagh and Tullintain to Ballymagowan – if you’re in the Parish of Killaghtee, please consider entering.No fee to enter as Dunkineely Community Limited has funding from Donegal Local Development Company. We’ll be looking for winners of categories such as:> Best Business > Best small town garden > Best Church > Best school > Best vegetable plot> Best large garden > Best container garden etc.The main winners will be the community of Dunkineely, Bruckless and Killaghtee area if we all take part however small or big a garden plot/place for window boxes/pots we have.Judging will take place Sunday 10th August but the main winners will be the community of Dunkineely, Killaghtee and Bruckless area.Entry forms available from the Dunkineely Community Limited Office and in local business’s in the Community.“This is a great Community event if we all get involved!” If you are interested contact Dunkineely Community Limited Office on 074 9737678 if you’d like enter or help organise in anyway.BRUCKLESS ROAD RUNNERS – THE POINT 10K CHARITY FUN/RUN/WALK – Is taking place in Dunkineely on Saturday 16th August 2014 at 11:00 am (Same route as last year).The chosen charities for this year’s event are Billy’s World Ireland and Clara House Killybegs – (Day Centre for Intellectual Disabilities). Everyone welcome! Contact Pauric McNern for further information.A DEFIBRILLATOR – Is now in Killaghtee School, it is on the wall closest to the road. The following people are trained and key holders:Andrew Walker – 087 2276366Carol Duddy – 074 9737046Norman Henry – 087 9474350Phyllis Young – 087 1300499Clive Vance – 086 8276575Georgina Armstrong – 087 3921384.There is also a key in the following places: Dunkineely Health Centre, Dunkineely Community Limited Office and Killaghtee School.DCL – Has a library of over 500 books from Children’s Literature. (Roald Dhal’s Matilda, James and the Giant Peach, The BFG to J.K. Rowling’s Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone & The Goblet of Fire), Classics (J.R.R. Tolkien to Marian Keyes), Horror, Comedy, Booker-Prize etc.Rent a book from just 20c or perhaps DVD’s, Lego Batman or The Patience Stone from just 50c per night.Come into the office weekday mornings from 9:30 – 12:30 pm and use the Internet (20c per half hour) or Print Documents (20c per page).Please note that Dunkineely Community Limited office has changed it’s number to 074 9737678.DD LOCAL: DUNKINEELY COMMUNITY GEARING UP FOR FESTIVAL was last modified: July 7th, 2014 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Tags:DD LOCAL: DunkineelyFeaturesNoticeslast_img read more

MINISTER McHUGH WELCOMES €1.5M COMMUNITY ACTION FUNDING FOR DONEGAL

first_imgMinister Joe McHughMinister of State Joe McHugh has welcomed the announcement regarding the results of the Social Inclusion and Community Activation Programme (SICAP) tendering process, which will result in a total of €28 million being made available for SICAP for the nine months of 2015, with the new programme running until 2017.More than €1.5M will be allocated in Donegal, he said.“The SICAP programme underpins this Government’s commitment to social inclusion and community development through its goals of tackling poverty, social exclusion and long-term unemployment through local engagement and partnership between disadvantaged individuals, community organisations, public sector agencies and other stakeholders,” said Minister McHugh. “Donegal will receive a total of €1.5million, which includes a breakdown of €447,885 for Inishowen, €254,561 for Gaeltacht areas, and €778,489 for other Donegal areas.“Undoubtedly, this will be of huge benefit to these areas. Rural Ireland has, over the past number of years, been very heavily affected by cutbacks and unemployment, much of which has occurred in already disadvantaged communities.“I know from experience as a youth-worker that community programmes such as the SICAP one announced today, can make a real difference to communities on the ground, especially those in our rural areas and to counties like Donegal. I am happy to welcome the Minister’s announcement today, which ensures that those who were so badly impacted by the economic down-turn will see the real benefits.”“Cuirim fáilte róímh an deá-nuacht seo inniú maidir le limistéar faoi mhíbhuntáiste, agus an tacaíocht breise a bheas ar fail daofa”  MINISTER McHUGH WELCOMES €1.5M COMMUNITY ACTION FUNDING FOR DONEGAL was last modified: March 3rd, 2015 by John2Share this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:community fundingdonegalJoe McHughlast_img read more

Sunsa is shining for South African entrepreneurs

first_img“Get up, step up and ride the entrepreneurship wave rising in South Africa.” Minister of Small Business, Lindiwe Zulu (above) (image: Sunsa)Entrepreneurship got a much-needed shot in the arm with the launch yesterday of Startup Nations South Africa (Sunsa), a collaborative effort aimed at helping start-ups in South Africa.It was launched at Wits Business School on 10 November by Minister of Small Business Lindiwe Zulu, The Innovation Hub chief executive McLean Sibanda, and Industrial Development Corporation (IDC) chief executive Geoffrey Qhena. Sunsa is a collaborative effort between The Innovation Hub, a subsidiary of the Gauteng Growth and Development Agency that helps to drive sustainable job creation and inclusive economic growth and development in Gauteng; the IDC, the state-owned development finance institution; and Wits Business School.Sunsa joins a global network, including Startup Britain, Startup Chile, Startup Malaysia, Startup China, Startup Norway, Startup Australia and more recently Startup Brazil, Startup Vietnam and Startup Korea. This is a global community leading a revolution in entrepreneurship. It focuses on advancing the national agenda for entrepreneurship and the creation of a sustainable environment where start-ups and small businesses can meaningfully contribute to the economic and social development of a country.In South Africa, Sunsa aims to build a trusted knowledge-network of highly connected local and global innovation and entrepreneur thought leaders who will provide strategic guidance on how best to create a national impact and encourage dialogue on entrepreneurship capacity development.COLLABORATIVE ENTREPRENEURSHIPIt will focus on creating a national collaboration platform between the public sector, private sector, academia and civil society. It is believed this collaborative effort will mobilise human, financial and institutional resources as a means to support, develop and grow start-up businesses in South Africa.“Get up, step up and ride the entrepreneurship wave rising in South Africa,” said Zulu. “The Global Entrepreneurship Monitor 2012 annual survey reminds us that entrepreneurship levels in our country are the lowest they have been in three years. The call to action is for all of us to work hard to inculcate a culture of entrepreneurship in the country. We must consciously strive to build a nation of entrepreneurs and not a nation of job-seekers.”In the spirit of vukuzenzele – an IsiZulu words that loosely translates as “wake up and do for self” – she added, “our people must seize the economic opportunities presented by our democracy and freedom to build and grow businesses”.Qhena said that while challenges continued to characterise certain sectors of the economy, “I need to emphasise this point to small business owners – there are abundant opportunities for growth in certain sectors of the economy… As the IDC and Startup Nations South Africa, we need to inform them of these opportunities and help them to commercialise these opportunities and get a slice of the pie.”Sunsa will work to make concrete South Africa’s National Development Plan or Vision 2030. Qhena explained that the IDC’s infrastructure would be used to leverage Sunsa’s activities and impact so that it could support, uplift and develop small and medium enterprises and youth.INNOVATION IS KEYAn entrepreneur ecosystem that drives innovative solutions for local problems is needed, Sunsa contends, hence its mantra – spark, seed and sustain. As a full member of Startup Nations and Global Entrepreneurship Week, supported by the Kauffman Foundation, it will enable local start-up businesses to share best practices and collaborate with like-minded peers around the world.“Innovation is critical for the growth of our economy, as the National Development Plan acknowledges,” Sibanda said. “Start-ups are important elements of ensuring that innovation reaches the market and starts to contribute towards job creation, poverty reduction and competitiveness… The Innovation Hub supports the establishment of the Startup Nations South Africa platform as a means of creating an enabling environment that will contribute to start-ups becoming high growth businesses.”To join the Startup revolution, visit Sunsa’s website or interact with it on Facebook and Twitter; the handle is @Startup_Nations.last_img read more

Off-Grid in Canada: The Building Envelope

first_imgDouble-stud wallsFor the above-grade walls, we ended up using a double-stud wall assembly. The structure of the house is built with 2×8 lumber, which allowed both for necessary support on the tall wall in the upstairs, as well as providing a deep space for insulation. The bays in this wall were filled with Roxul batt insulation, a mineral wool product. Mineral wool is a quite well regarded insulation, as it is very pest, water, and fire resistant, is easy to install, and holds its shape well, all leading to good long service.On the inside of this 2×8 wall is the polyethylene air/vapor barrier. Inside of that is a 2×4 utility wall, holding all of the electrical, plumbing, and data cabling. This wall is also insulated with Roxul insulation. Finally, a standard layer of sheetrock provides the interior walls.A big advantage of the utility wall is that all of the openings that need to be cut, for outlets, fixtures, etc., don’t need to punch holes in the air barrier, keeping the air tightness higher. Outside of the 2×8 wall, there is a layer of plywood, then 1 1/2 inches of Roxul ComfortBoard, which is very similar to the batt insulation we used, but a firmer and coming in sheets.Wrapping all the walls in mineral wool limits thermal bridging, where heat would pass through the wood framing (which is a poor insulator compared to the insulation it holds in place).Finally, the exterior has 1×3 wooden strapping to allow for air circulation and water drainage, on which Hardie fiber cement board is mounted. Altogether these walls are a nominal R-47. When first looking at how much insulation to put into the house, I looked to the Passive House certification system. To get Passive House certification, there is a hard limit on the amount of energy needed to heat and cool a space of 15 kilowatt hours per square meter per year (kWh/m²/a), which works out to about 1/10th the amount that a typical house uses.It turns out this is a very difficult bar to meet in cold climates, with the amount of insulation required being simply immense. With a house like ours it would have required walls roughly 2 feet thick (instead of the 6 to 8 inches typical in current construction). After doing a bit of math, it didn’t seem like this was an investment that would ever pay off, so instead we only took inspiration from the Passive House ideals, rather than attempting to meet them. Trying to balance cost and efficiency, we still ended up with a wall assembly roughly 15 inches thick Basement insulationFor below-grade walls, the final assembly is a simpler one. From the outside, there is a 2-inch thick layer of vertical rigid EPS (expanded polystyrene) foam, with a 4-foot-wide horizontal skirt of the same material buried approximately 1 foot below the outside ground surface. This skirt reduces the ability of cold winter temperatures from passing through the soil to reach the lower walls and foundation of the house. Essentially, the cold is slowed down as it has to go through or around that skirt.Below-grade walls are insulated with 2 inches of EPS on the outside and 4 inches of EPS on the inside.Inside the 2 inches of foam there is a waterproof membrane stuck to an 8-inch-thick poured concrete wall. Inside of the concrete wall is a 4-inch layer of EPS, with a polyethylene barrier to the inside. The final layer is the same 2×4 utility wall mentioned above, covered by drywall. This total assembly measures R-40. Underneath the basement concrete slab are 4 inches of rigid foam (R-16).A couple of other finishing details really help to reduce the basement heating loads. First, the basement concrete slab is actually encased on three sides by foam, coming down from the walls, and then with the foam underneath — it essentially looks like a foam bathtub. This significantly reduces thermal bridging, making the diffusion of heat into the ground or concrete walls slower. The Pretty Good HouseStrategies and Details: Double-Stud Wall ConstructionLstiburek’s Ideal Double-Stud Wall DesignHow to Design a Wall Calculating the Minimum Thickness of Rigid Foam Sheathing RELATED ARTICLES An R-80 ceilingFor those of you familiar with reading building plans, I have posted the final house plans with all building details. Plans seem to be shared only infrequently, but I am not too concerned about someone copying our home; if you would like to borrow any details, please do so.Starting from the top, we built a cathedral ceiling using a single pitched shed-style roof. We used manufactured trusses with 3 feet of depth built in for insulation. Into this space a layer of 3½-inch Roxul mineral wool batt insulation was laid down covering the entire bottom of the ceiling cavity. Loose cellulose insulation was then blown in above, mostly filling the space, reaching an estimated R-80 for the ceiling.It was originally specified to be R-60, but there was enough space for more insulation, and cellulose is relatively cheap and easy to install, so a last-minute upgrade was done during installation. With the energy modeling that we did after the house was complete, it turns out that the R-60 would have been sufficient, as only a very small proportion of the heat loss would have been through the roof even at R-60.Beneath the rest of the insulation was a standard polyethylene air and vapor barrier, preventing air movement and controlling vapor movement. The final interior layer is veneer plywood sheets that make for a very attractive ceiling to the room below. Triple-pane windowsAll the windows in the house have fiberglass frames, are triple-paned with argon fill, and have an insulating value of roughly R-5. The windows facing south are all chosen to allow in more of the sun’s heat (a higher solar heat gain coefficient, or SHGC), whereas windows facing all other directions have a low SHGC.The difference between them is that the high-gain windows allow in approximately 50% of the sun’s heat, whereas the low SHGC windows let in only about 30%. The interesting thing about passive solar design is that much of the heating load is carried by the heat coming in the windows, with energy modeling suggesting that about 30% of the house’s total heat needs are being provided by the sun shining through the windows.center_img This is the second in a series of posts by Craig Anderson describing the off-the-grid house he built with his wife France-Pascale Ménard near Low, Québec. The first installment was titled Building an Off-Grid Home in Canada. Craig writes about the “Seven Hills Project” in a blog called Sunshine Saved. Hindsight is always 20-20There is a lot of interesting work going on by builders trying quite a lot of ways to build very high-efficiency homes that are simpler and cheaper than the methods we used. Even now, less than two years after our house was completed, there are already some things that we could change.One example comes from Ecohome, where our LEED certifier Mike Reynolds works. Ecohome’s recent Edelweiss House is significantly more efficient than our home, and also was cheaper to build. It’s constructed with only a standard 2×6 wall and lots of exterior insulation. Needless to say, though, the house we have built is a very good one. There are many good ways to put together a high-performance building envelope. Another heuristic that I picked up from our architect is the 60-40-30-20 rule. This suggests putting R-60 of insulation in the ceiling, R-40 in above-grade walls, R-30 in basement walls, and R-20 underneath the basement slab, which is much closer to what we actually did. I’ve also heard of concepts similar to this called “the pretty good house.” While a house like this won’t reach that Passive House standard, it will still cut by half or two-thirds the amount of energy needed to heat and cool a home. Reducing air leakageThe final thing that always needs to be mentioned when discussing a building envelope is airtightness. There used to be ideas floating around that a house needed to “breathe,” but these ideas have long since been discredited, and high quality builders now look to build houses as tightly as possible, then actively bring in fresh air with a device like a heat-recovery ventilator (HRV).Airtightness is measured in air changes per hour (ach), which measures the total volume of air inside a building, and how many times in one hour that this much air would be replaced when a home is slightly depressurized with a big fan (for a pressure difference between inside and outside of 50 pascals, or ach50). Old, leaky homes may have a number like 10 ach50 (or even much higher), meaning that the air inside is replaced by outside air about 10 times each hour when depressurized.Passive house rules require 0.6 ach50. Our house, with the polyethylene barrier mentioned multiple times above, measured at 1.47 ach50 when the house was half done, the outer 2×8 wall in place with the air barrier. The house is probably much tighter than that now with the utility wall, sheetrock, paint, and caulking all in place, but we never quite got around to getting a second measurement after the house was complete.(Our builder, Stephane Charette of Bala Structures, created a time-lapse video (and accompanying vocals) of the walls and roof trusses being set into place with a crane — it will give you a good idea of how the house was assembled.) BLOGS BY CRAIG ANDERSON Building an Off-Grid Home in Canadalast_img read more

Kalmadi thanks Delhiites and others for ‘successful’ CWG

first_imgCommonwealth Games Organising Committee Chairman Suresh Kalmadi on Sunday thanked Delhiites and “unseen” people for their contribution in making various events successful during the grand sporting event and said “excellent” results will help spread the message of Olympics.”The citizens of Delhi have happily joined hands with Delhi Police to ensure the implementations of the Games Lane so that the athletes’ schedules are not affected by traffic.No event of this magnitude can be successful without the contribution of several people, unseen but vital,” Kalmadi said in Village News – a special daily newspaper, meant for Commonwealth Games Village residents.He said there have been some fabulous results from the velodrome and the pool.”The number of new Games records set is a testimony to the quality of competition and the field of play,” he said adding that “I am confident that such excellent results will help spread the message of Olympic sport in India.”Kalmadi said his colleagues in the Indian Olympic Association share the optimism that “we can build on the surge of interest and enthusiasm among sports fans in the country.We know we can build on this to sustain the development of many new champions.”It is pleasing to note that all competitions have been held according to schedule thus far.”The 19th Commonwealth Games being hosted by the country was marred by several controversies including corruption and filthiness in several facilities meant for athletes.Over 7,000 athletes from 71 nations are living in the Commonwealth Games Village to participate in 12-day-long sporting event scheduled to end on October 14.advertisementlast_img read more

‘Kovac is the right man for Bayern’

first_imgLothar Matthaus has backed under-fire Bayern Munich manager Niko Kovac – and slammed the German giants’ star players and hierarchy.Bayern have not won in four games and were beaten 3-0 at home by Borussia Monchengladbach on Saturday.Club legend Matthaus admitted that performance was one of Bayern’s ‘worst in years’ – but says they are paying the price for failing to rejuvenate an ageing squad, rather than blaming Croatian Kovac. Article continues below Editors’ Picks Man Utd ready to spend big on Sancho and Haaland in January Who is Marcus Thuram? Lilian’s son who is top of the Bundesliga with Borussia Monchengladbach Brazil, beware! Messi and Argentina out for revenge after Copa controversy Best player in MLS? Zlatan wasn’t even the best player in LA! Bayern have slipped to sixth in the Bundesliga and Matthaus told Blick : “Many players have been awarded new contracts and Bayern ignored exciting talents in the transfer market. “I can’t understand it. Bayern had nine players in the field on Saturday, who played in the Champions League final in 2013.”Former Bayern midfielder Kovac, 46, only succeeded Jupp Heynckes in the summer and, despite a run of seven wins at the start of the season, has seen his side struggle in recent weeks.Club president Uli Hoeness has suggested Kovac is ‘putting his neck on the line’ due to his rotation policy – but Matthaus, who played for Bayern in two spells between 1984 and 2000, is behind the former Croatia and Eintracht Frankfurt boss.”He’s an ambitious guy with a plan,” he added. “He is the right man to turn things around. The responsibility is more club management and players.”And he singled out star names such as James Rodriguez, Robert Lewandowski, Arjen Robben and Franck Ribery for criticism.”Players like James and Lewandowski, Robben and Ribery – some stars are selfish and disrespectful to coaches, club and team-mates. This must stop. “Uli Hoeness has to give up sayings like that. He and [sports director] Hasan Salihamidzic need to make it clear to players that they need to change their negative body language.”last_img read more

Cut-Rate “Save”-ior? – Yanks Get Yates

first_imgNEW YORK — The Yankees have acquired reliever Kirby Yates from the Cleveland Indians for $78,000.A 28-year-old right-hander, Yates had a fastball in the 92-94 mph range last season. He was 1-2 with one save and a 5.27 ERA in 57 relief appearances for Tampa Bay in 2014-15, then was acquired by Cleveland for cash Nov. 25.Yates has a 14-14 records in seven minor league seasons with 69 saves and a 2.67 ERA.The trade was announced Friday.TweetPinShare0 Shareslast_img