Category: mmacigbc

What course can I take in a year?

first_img Comments are closed. A Bachelor of Commerce, I graduated in 1991 in India and have since beenworking mostly in IT recruitment. I now want to do a full-time course (not morethan a year) specialising in employee development, compensation and benefitsand appraisals or possibly in a broader HRM framework. Any suggestions? Also, Iam in London on a dependent visa (valid for the next two years) so would I betreated as an international student or would I be treated as a resident? Margaret Malpas, joint managing director, Malpas Flexible Learning It would probably be sensible to take the CIPD Certificate In PersonnelPractice which can be achieved in a year or less if you decide to adopt aflexible learning approach. This qualification will provide a good introduction to the basic principlesof HR management and, if successful, will give you associate membership of CIPDif you wish to broaden your skills and move away from specialist recruitmentconsultancy. Information about training providers is available from the CIPD website atwww.cipd.co.uk Jo Selby, associate director, EJ Human Resources You need to identify exactly what it is that you want to achieve from a12-month course and investigate what the options are at universities/collegesnear you which will meet your requirements. To establish what status your two-year visa gives you, speak to the relevantdepartment at the Home Office initially. They should be able to tell you, or ifnot certainly point you in the right direction. For some ideas on where to study for HR qualifications, see our HR Academyfeature at www.personneltoday.com/careerguides Previous Article Next Article What course can I take in a year?On 4 Dec 2001 in Personnel Today Related posts:No related photos.last_img read more

Antarctic ecosystems. The freshwater lakes of Signy Island and their fauna

first_imgPrior to 1962 work on freshwater within the British Sector of the Antarctic had been confined to the collection of specimens and their subsequent taxonomic evaluation. Collections were made by such expeditions as the Scottish National Antarctic Expedition 1902- 04, the various Discovery Investigations in this region 1925-37, the British Graham Land Expedition 1934-37 and the Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey 1945-62. During the 1961/1962 summer season an ecological investigation of the freshwater lakes of Signy Island, South Orkney Islands, was started. This paper is an interim report on that work.last_img read more

Russia to Spend About USD 28.52 Billion for Arms in 2012, Prime Minister Says

first_img View post tag: 2012 November 16, 2011 Russian federal budget 2012 provides over RUR 880 bln for arms procurement, modernization and RD works, said Russian Prime Minister Vladimir Putin at the meeting on defense order issues.As for him, it was invested RUR 750 bln for this purpose in 2011 which is 1.5 times larger than in 2009.Considering such significant funds appropriated for defense order, Putin turned attention to the necessity of cooperation amid all agencies, primarily between defense ministry and military-oriented industry.According to the premier, “money should work effectively, and all spendings must be thoroughly justified”.Putin emphasized that “defense industry should clearly understand what kind of demands are placed on production and how future contracts would be financed”.“Defense ministry must be also aware what benchmark price is. We came to conclusion in Arkhangelsk that defense ministry should change some views on the problem as well”, Putin said.To avoid the situation happened this year to defense contracting, Putin proposed to establish a special panel including representatives of governmental economic committee, defense ministry, tariff service, ministry of industry, and ministry of finance. Main purpose of such panel would be “pricing issues not only regarding end items but along the whole production chain and assortment“, stressed Vladimir Putin.The second task would be “not only monitoring of timely contracting but control over all stages of contract execution and production quality”.“If we fail to create a reliable tool in this area, we would be out of schedule“, concluded Vladimir Putin.[mappress]Naval Today Staff, November 16, 2011; Image: premier Back to overview,Home naval-today Russia to Spend About USD 28.52 Billion for Arms in 2012, Prime Minister Says View post tag: Naval Russia to Spend About USD 28.52 Billion for Arms in 2012, Prime Minister Says View post tag: Arms View post tag: USD View post tag: Russia View post tag: spend View post tag: Ministercenter_img View post tag: billion View post tag: Prime View post tag: News by topic Authorities View post tag: Navy View post tag: says View post tag: about View post tag: 28.52 Share this articlelast_img read more

IS CONGRESS DECLARING WAR ON ISIS… OR ON YOU?

first_imgIS CONGRESS DECLARING WAR ON ISIS….OR ON YOU? FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailShare  By Ron PaulPassage of Senator Mitch McConnell’s authorization for war against ISIS will not only lead to perpetual US wars across the globe, it will also endanger our civil and economic liberties. The measure allows the president to place troops anywhere he determines ISIS is operating. Therefore, it could be used to justify using military force against United States citizens on U.S. territory. It may even be used to justify imposing martial law in America.The President does not have to deploy the U.S. military to turn America into a militarized police state, however. He can use his unlimited authority to expand programs that turn local police forces into adjuncts of the U.S. military, and send them increasing amounts of military equipment. Using the threat of ISIS to justify increased police militarization will be enthusiastically supported by police unions, local officials, and, of course, politically-powerful defense contractors. The only opposition will come from citizens whose rights have been violated by a militarized police force that views the people as the enemy.Even though there is no evidence that the government’s mass surveillance programs have prevented even a single terrorist attack, we are still continuously lectured about how we must sacrifice our liberty for security. The cries for the government to take more of our privacy will grow louder as the war party and its allies in the media continue to hype the threat of terrorism. A president armed with the authority to do whatever it takes to stop ISIS will no doubt heed these calls for new restrictions on our privacy.Following last year’s mass shooting in California, President Obama called for restricting the Second Amendment rights of any American on the “terrorist watch list.” The president also used the attacks to expand the unconstitutional gun background check system via executive action. Can anyone doubt that President Obama — or a future anti-gun president — will use the absolute power to do whatever is necessary to stop terrorism as a justification for imposing new gun control measures? Using the war on ISIS to justify more gun control will be particularly attractive since even many pro-gun politicians will support gun control measures if they are marketed as part of the war on terror.As the American economy faces continued stagnation, and as challenges to the dollar’s status as the world’s reserve currency mount, an increasingly authoritarian government will impose new restrictions on our economic activities and new limits on our financial privacy. In particular, our ability to move assets out of the country will be limited, and new reporting and other requirements will limit our ability to use cash without being treated as criminals or terrorists. Those who carry large amounts of cash will find themselves at increased risk of having the cash confiscated by government agents under civil asset forfeiture laws.If Senator McConnell’s declaration of perpetual war passes, presidents could use the war on ISIS as a justification to impose new restrictions on our use of cash and our financial privacy via executive action. After all, they will say, the government needs to make sure cash is not being used to support ISIS.The only way to protect both liberty and security is to stop trying to impose our will on other countries by military force. The resentment created by America’s militaristic foreign policy is ISIS’ most effective recruiting tool. Adopting a non-interventionist foreign policy that seeks peace and free trade with all would enable the government to counter legitimate threats to our safety without creating an authoritarian police state.FOOTNOTE:  Ron Paul is a former Congressman and Presidential candidate.  last_img read more

LINK TO THE CITY COUNCIL AGENDA

first_imgCITY COUNCIL AGENDA JUNE 13, 2016 ROOM 301, CIVIC CENTER 5:30 P.M. CITY COUNCIL AGENDA JUNE 13, 2016 ROOM 301, CIVIC CENTER 5:30 P.M.COUNCIL AS A WHOLE ORDINANCE F-2016-11 FINANCE McGINNAn Ordinance of the Common Council of the City of Evansville Authorizing Transfers of Appropriations, Additional Appropriations and Repeal and Re-Appropriation of Funds for Various City FundsORDINANCE F-2016-12 FINANCE McGINNAn Ordinance Consenting to the Issuance by the Vanderburgh County Redevelopment Commission of Certain Tax Increment Refunding Revenue BondsORDINANCE F-2016-13 FINANCE McGINNAn Ordinance of the Common Council of the City of Evansville Authorizing Repeal, Re- Appropriations and Additional Appropriations of Funds within the Department of Metropolitan DevelopmentRESOLUTION C-2016-10 A.S.D. MERCER, MOSBY & ADAMSA Resolution Approving a Mutual Aid Assistance Agreement with the City of Henderson ROLL CALLPLEDGE OF ALLEGIANCE Representative: SameDistrict: Hargis, Ward 3ORDINANCE R-2016-09 APC C-4 to C-2 1 An Ordinance to Rezone Certain Real Estate in the City of Evansville, State of Indiana, More Commonly Known as 2021 S Weinbach Ave.Petitioner: AB Weinbach, LLCOwners: SameRepresentative: Cash Waggner & Associates, PC District: Robinson, Ward 4ORDINANCE R-2016-10 APC R-1 to C-1An Ordinance to Rezone Certain Real Estate in the City of Evansville, State of Indiana, More Commonly Known as 1300 Harmony WayPetitioner: Catholic Diocese of EvansvilleOwners: SameRepresentative: Morgan D. Jones District: Brinkmeyer, Ward 6ORDINANCE R-2016-11 APC R-1 to C-4 w/ UDCAn Ordinance to Rezone Certain Real Estate in the City of Evansville, State of Indiana, More Commonly Known as 4405 N Green River Rd.Petitioner: C & K Partnership, LPOwners: Marsha K Farwick & Karen Walthall TrustRepresentative: Marco DeLucio District: McGinn, Ward 1 3 ORDINANCE R-2016-07 APC C-4 to C-2An Ordinance to Rezone Certain Real Estate in the City of Evansville, State of Indiana, More Commonly Known as 2301 W MichiganPetitioner: Robert & Cindy RexingOwners: 2301 W Michigan LLCRepresentative: Robert & Cindy Rexing District: Brinkmeyer, Ward 6ORDINANCE R-2016-08 APC C-4 to R-2An Ordinance to Rezone Certain Real Estate in the City of Evansville, State of Indiana, More Commonly Known as 200 E Columbia St.Petitioner: Timothy KonrathOwners: Same RESOLUTION C-2016-11 A.S.D.A Resolution of the Common Council of the City of Evansville, Indiana Adopting the Evansville-Vanderburgh County Comprehensive Plan 2015-2035REGULAR AGENDATHIRD READING OF ORDINANCES AND RESOLUTIONSORDINANCE F-2016-11 FINANCE CITY COUNCIL AGENDA JUNE 13, 2016 ROOM 301, CIVIC CENTER 5:30 P.M. ORDINANCE G-2016-19 A.S.D. McGINNAn Ordinance to Vacate a Certain Easement Within the City of Evansville, Indiana, Storm Drain Easement Across Lots 4 and 5, Stonefield Crossing Subdivision, Parcel ID 82-06-14-015- 170.027ORDINANCE G-2016-20 A.S.D. McGINNAn Ordinance to Vacate Certain Public Ways or Public Places with the City of Evansville, Indiana, Commonly Known as that Portion of a 10-Foot Public Utility Easement on Lot 26 in East Pointe Business Park, Section 4, Also that Part of a 10-Foot Public Utility Easement on Lot 12 in East Pointe Business Park, Section 6, Also All that Part of a Lake Maintenance and Storm Drainage Easement on Lot 12 in East Pointe Business Park, Section 6ORDINANCE F-2016-14 FINANCE McGINNAn Ordinance of the Common Council of the City of Evansville Authorizing Transfers of Appropriations, Additional Appropriations and Repeal and Re-Appropriation of Funds for Various City FundsORDINANCE F-2016-15 FINANCE McGINNAn Ordinance of the Common Council of the City of Evansville Authorizing Transfers of Appropriations, Additional Appropriations and Repeal and Re-Appropriation of Funds for Various City FundsRESOLUTION C-2016-12 FINANCE McGINNResolution of the Common Council of the City of Evansville, Indiana, Regarding the Implementation of Certain Internal Control Standards and ProceduresRESOLUTION C-2016-13 FINANCE McGINNResolution of the Common Council of the City of Evansville, Indiana, Regarding Reporting Erroneous or Irregular Material Variances, Losses, Shortages or Theft of Public Funds APPROVAL OF MEETING MEMORANDUMREPORTS AND COMMUNICATIONSCONSENT AGENDAFIRST READING OF ORDINANCES AND RESOLUTIONS CITY COUNCIL AGENDA JUNE 13, 2016 ROOM 301, CIVIC CENTER 5:30 P.M. An Ordinance to Rezone Certain Real Estate in the City of Evansville, State of Indiana, More Commonly Known as 2021 S Weinbach Ave.Petitioner: AB Weinbach, LLCOwners: SameRepresentative: Cash Waggner & Associates, PC District: Robinson, Ward 4ORDINANCE R-2016-10 APC R-1 to C-1An Ordinance to Rezone Certain Real Estate in the City of Evansville, State of Indiana, More Commonly Known as 1300 Harmony WayPetitioner: Catholic Diocese of EvansvilleOwners: SameRepresentative: Morgan D. Jones District: Brinkmeyer, Ward 6ORDINANCE R-2016-11 APC R-1 to C-4 w/ UDCAn Ordinance to Rezone Certain Real Estate in the City of Evansville, State of Indiana, More Commonly Known as 4405 N Green River Rd.Petitioner: C & K Partnership, LPOwners: Marsha K Farwick & Karen Walthall TrustRepresentative: Marco DeLucio District: McGinn, Ward 1 CONSENT AGENDASECOND READING OF ZONING ORDINANCEScenter_img C-4 to C-2 An Ordinance of the Common Council of the City of Evansville Authorizing Transfers of Appropriations, Additional Appropriations and Repeal and Re-Appropriation of Funds for Various City FundsORDINANCE F-2016-12 FINANCE McGINNAn Ordinance Consenting to the Issuance by the Vanderburgh County Redevelopment Commission of Certain Tax Increment Refunding Revenue BondsORDINANCE F-2016-13 FINANCE McGINNAn Ordinance of the Common Council of the City of Evansville Authorizing Repeal, Re- Appropriations and Additional Appropriations of Funds within the Department of Metropolitan DevelopmentRESOLUTION C-2016-10 A.S.D. MERCER, MOSBY & ADAMSA Resolution Approving a Mutual Aid Assistance Agreement with the City of HendersonRESOLUTION C-2016-11 A.S.D. ADAMSA Resolution of the Common Council of the City of Evansville, Indiana Adopting the Evansville-Vanderburgh County Comprehensive Plan 2015-2035 4 CONSENT AGENDASECOND READING OF ORDINANCES AND RESOLUTIONS Representative: SameDistrict: Hargis, Ward 3ORDINANCE R-2016-09 APC REGULAR AGENDATHIRD READING OF ZONING ORDINANCES ADAMSMcGINN AGENDA DOCKET CITY COUNCIL AGENDA JUNE 13, 2016 ROOM 301, CIVIC CENTER 5:30 P.M. Resolution Approving an Agreement Between the City of Evansville and Vanderburgh County Regarding the Distribution of Funds Received from the 2016 Byrne Justice Grant Program AwardRESOLUTION C-2016-15 DOCKET MOSBYResolution Approving an Interlocal Agreement Between the City of Evansville and Vanderburgh County for the City to Acquire Certain Tax Delinquent Property From the County for the Purpose of Blight EliminationMISCELLANEOUS BUSINESSThe next meeting of the Common Council will be Monday, June 27, 2016 at 5:30 p.m. Committee meetings will begin at 5:00 p.m.ADJOURNMENT ORDINANCE R-2016-07 APC C-4 to C-2An Ordinance to Rezone Certain Real Estate in the City of Evansville, State of Indiana, More Commonly Known as 2301 W MichiganPetitioner: Robert & Cindy RexingOwners: 2301 W Michigan LLCRepresentative: Robert & Cindy Rexing District: Brinkmeyer, Ward 6ORDINANCE R-2016-08 APC C-4 to R-2An Ordinance to Rezone Certain Real Estate in the City of Evansville, State of Indiana, More Commonly Known as 200 E Columbia St.Petitioner: Timothy KonrathOwners: Same 2 RESOLUTION DOCKET RESOLUTION C-2016-14 FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img read more

News story: Police and National Crime Agency pay review bodies appoint new chair

first_imgAnita Bharucha will oversee independent recommendations on police and NCA officer pay.Anita Bharucha has been a member of the PRRB since December 2014. Her appointment as chair commenced on 18 December 2018 and will last for three years.Ms Bharucha is currently Chief Operating Officer of the Smith School of Enterprise and Environment at the University of Oxford. She also chairs the audit and governance committee of the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority.Furthermore, the Home Secretary has appointed four members to sit on the PRRB and NCARRB. The appointees are Andy Bliss, Richard Childs, Patrick McCartan and Trevor Reaney.Mr Bliss QPM had a career of more than 20 years in policing, most recently serving as chief constable of Hertfordshire Constabulary between 2011 and 2016.Mr Childs QPM served as a police officer for 30 years and has also ran his own private consultancy across various industries, including security and policing.Mr McCartan CBE has previously chaired the Independent Financial Review Panel of the Northern Ireland Assembly and the Police Pensions Board Northern Ireland.Mr Reaney CBE most recently served as Clerk and Chief Executive of the Northern Ireland Assembly between 2008 and his retirement in 2016. He was also previously the Chief Executive of the Northern Ireland Policing Board.The PRRB makes independent recommendations concerning the pay and conditions of police officers to the Home Secretary and the Northern Ireland Minister of Justice.The PRRB’s recommendations concern police officers at or below the rank of chief superintendent and cover allowances, hours of duty, leave and other matters.The NCARRB makes independent recommendations to the government on the pay and allowances of NCA officers designated with operational powers.last_img read more

Faculty Council meeting, Jan. 27

first_imgAt its seventh meeting of the year on Jan. 27, the Faculty Council reviewed proposals to rename the Department of Literature and Comparative Literature and to establish a new concentration in biomedical engineering. The council also discussed updates from the Office for Scholarly Communication regarding Harvard’s DASH and Open Access Fund, and from Michael D. Smith, dean of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences, regarding the findings of the Priorities Working Groups.The council next meets on Feb. 10. The preliminary deadline for the March 2 faculty meeting is Feb. 15 at 9:30 a.m.last_img read more

Freedom in motion

first_imgAfter nearly two decades under house arrest at the hands of Burma’s military regime, pro-democracy activist Aung San Suu Kyi — now a member of the burgeoning democratic nation’s parliament — is in the midst of a long-awaited visit to the United States. At Harvard Kennedy School (HKS) on Thursday, the Nobel Peace Prize laureate and international icon outlined her first goal for her country’s future: educating Burma’s people in how “to be citizens of a free society.”“We have just started on the road toward shaping our country into the kind of nation that we want it to be,” Suu Kyi told a packed hall. “We want to start out by creating a responsible society. … Freedom and responsibility are different sides of the same coin.”In 2010, Suu Kyi was released from house arrest, where she had spent 15 of the previous 21 years imprisoned as a result of a crackdown on the country’s 1988 mass demonstrations. Earlier this year, she was elected to the lower house of the Burmese Parliament, and now serves as chair of her party, the National League for Democracy (NLD).“Despite imprisonment and intimidation, confinement and surveillance, she has stood always for nonviolent opposition, for unity in the face of adversity, for lasting freedom from, in her own words, ‘the enervating miasma of fear,’” said Harvard President Drew Faust, who introduced Suu Kyi. Throughout her time in the international spotlight, Faust added, Suu Kyi has displayed “a serene tenacity that continues to be a defining feature of her leadership.”That commanding presence was on full display at the John F. Kennedy Jr. Forum, where a rapt crowd gathered to hear Suu Kyi deliver the 2012 Edwin L. Godkin Lecture, the most prestigious endowed lectureship at HKS. In her talk, she detailed the next steps for Burma, where many citizens have no experience of democracy.“When you’ve lived under a regime for so long, you do not know what it’s like to live in a free society,” she said. “The best way to be a truly responsible citizen in a free society is to act as though you are already a free citizen in a free society.“You cannot wait for everything to be done for you,” she continued. “We have had to teach our people in a very practical way” to take responsibility for their actions and choices, she said.That process began with the 2012 by-elections, where the NLD ultimately won 43 of 44 contested seats. Suu Kyi and the NLD had just six weeks to campaign and to educate distrustful and fearful voters in mostly rural districts.“We took a simple message to our people,” she said. Surprisingly, turnout reached 70 percent. “They had learned the lesson very well that they had to take part in the voting process if they wished to be considered responsible citizens.”Now that the NLD is able to govern, she said, the party is focusing on small projects, such as well-digging in rural villages, that give citizens a sense of ownership in their communities.The country still faces impediments to healthy democracy: human rights violations against religious minorities, the lack of a strong independent judiciary, and the absence of rule of law. For Burma to sustain its democracy, it must address those issues and focus on improving health and education among its citizens, Suu Kyi said.“Democracy and democratic values have to be embedded in our education system,” she said.Suu Kyi described her own struggle against the long-ruling military regime in no-nonsense terms. Though she was given a chance in 1998 to end her house arrest if she left Burma, her decision to stay was an easy one, she said.“I never thought of leaving Burma,” said Suu Kyi, who just this year was able to formally accept the Nobel Prize she received in 1991. “I always thought that as long as there was one person in Burma who still believed in democracy, I had to stay with that person.”Despite her determination over the past 24 years, Suu Kyi balked at the label of icon.“I’ve always thought of myself as a politician,” she explained, describing the hard work and discipline required to stay up-to-date on politics during her years of confinement. “From my point of view, icons do nothing except sit there.”Still, she appeared moved when audience members, many of them international students, said they were inspired by her example (one HKS Mason fellow told Suu Kyi, during the evening’s question-and-answer session, “You are more Pakistani than you realize”).“It has been a wonderful discovery, this sense of oneness,” Suu Kyi said.The feeling among forum-goers was mutual. In the words of the event’s moderator, HKS Dean David T. Ellwood, “You may not be an icon in your own words, but you sure are an inspiration.”last_img read more

Governance reform, two years in

first_imgRecognizing that the University had grown increasingly complex since its founding, the Harvard Corporation embarked on a series of changes designed to build its capacity and enable its members to think more strategically about the future, roughly doubling its membership to 13 and creating committees to focus on core fiduciary concerns such as finance, facilities planning, and governance. As the second anniversary of those reforms approached, President Drew Faust and Senior Fellow Robert Reischauer spoke with the Gazette about progress.GAZETTE: When the governance reforms were announced late in 2010, part of the aim was to increase the capacity of the Corporation. What has happened over the past two years?FAUST: There are two things I would focus on right away. One is the work of the new committees, particularly on finance and facilities. Both include Corporation members, but also other people with special expertise in those areas. I have sat in on meetings of both committees, and in each instance I’ve seen remarkable and deep insight on major issues we’re confronting, whether they involve questions of multiyear financial planning, or how we manage financial risk in complicated economic times, or how we approach and execute major capital projects. And, apart from the committees, having a larger Corporation means having more people with more knowledge about the wide variety of issues facing the University. That has an impact on the discussions in our Corporation meetings. And it also provides me with a circle of deeply engaged advisers I can turn to between meetings when I have a specific question in areas where they have expertise. So both the new committees and the enlarged Corporation help a great deal.REISCHAUER: I think the committee structure has also served to focus and organize the efforts of those working within the University. The individuals staffing these committees have always done a first-rate job, but the new structure now gives them a clearer sense of the kinds of analyses and information we need to strengthen our decisions. So, in a short period of time, I think the University-wide decision-making processes in the financial and capital planning areas have become more sophisticated and much improved.GAZETTE: Can you point to some specific examples of better outcomes?FAUST: In facilities, I’ve seen proposals for construction and building renovation that have been markedly improved by the insights of the committee members. The Tozzer renovation project, which involves social anthropology and the related library, benefited from a number of discussions in the Facilities Committee. House renewal is another example, on a larger scale. And the committee has helped us press ahead with a much more integrated, systematic approach to capital planning University-wide. In the Finance Committee, I’ve seen analogous activity where we’ve gotten a lot of wisdom from people on issues of debt and of the University’s central bank, and on how we manage both to be ambitious and careful in more challenging economic times. Also, the committee has boosted our ability to take on more rigorous financial planning on a longer time horizon and to see the University’s financial picture as a whole, while also focusing in on particular challenges like the prospect of reduced federal research support.REISCHAUER: On the Finance Committee, we’ve discussed a number of issues — the approach to the endowment distribution, the way we think about debt, how we operate our central bank, and how we look at budgets as part of a multiyear plan, to cite a few examples where our initial, in-depth discussions have led to modifications to the original proposal. I think we’ve consistently landed in a better place than would have been the case had the issues been dealt with in a single session by a smaller group, which was the previous practice.GAZETTE: Another stated aim of the governance changes was to ensure that the Corporation could think and act more strategically and less like a management committee. Have you seen progress toward that goal?FAUST: The new structure puts real strength behind the notion of thinking about the University as an integrated entity: doing financial planning on a multiyear basis; having a University-wide budget instead of just looking at individual School budgets; having a five-year capital plan that looks across Harvard as a whole; trying to bring together the academic piece with finance and fundraising and facilities so things all fit together. A big part of the agenda now for the Corporation is how to move the institution together in a united way into the strategic opportunities in front of us.GAZETTE: What are some of those opportunities?FAUST: I’m thinking about things like innovative teaching and learning, where we’ve begun taking some important steps; planning for Allston, which gives us a real opportunity to think more holistically about Harvard’s future; and envisioning our global strategy as a University, not simply as a number of Schools or individuals acting independently. I’m also thinking about edX and the promise we see in the digital domain, and about initiatives in areas ranging from engineering to the arts, and areas like energy and the environment where we need to work across boundaries. And about how the campaign can strengthen our financial foundations and at the same time enable some important new investments and initiatives.We’re also thinking about some other challenges we face, such as the changing environment affecting federal support for research and what that means for Harvard and for higher education in the years to come. How do we think about that challenge as an institution, and how do we prepare for it and respond to it?GAZETTE: You mentioned global engagement. What are you planning on the international front?FAUST: As you know, Harvard is inherently a global institution. We have students and faculty members from all over the world, and we have a vast array of research and educational programs going on in virtually every region of the globe. We want to continue that sense of broad engagement. At the same time, we’ve been talking about the possibility of creating a limited number of “global institutes” to reinforce and extend Harvard’s presence internationally — something that’s not a campus, that’s not a degree-granting entity, but more of a center that can provide some connective tissue between scholars from Harvard and people in different regions, that can serve a convening function in other parts of the world, and help focus collaborative efforts on some academic questions of real global importance. That’s something we are actively exploring.GAZETTE: You have six new members joining the Corporation. How has the dynamic of the group changed now that its membership has nearly doubled?REISCHAUER: First of all, we should remember that the four new members who’ve already joined the Corporation since we adopted the reforms are individuals who knew a lot about Harvard, and who’d been closely engaged with Harvard in one way or another. Susan Graham, Joe O’Donnell, and Paul Finnegan all were Overseers — we knew them as fellow members of the governing boards, and they knew the issues. Larry Bacow has three Harvard degrees, and he’s someone who, as president of Tufts and before that as chancellor of MIT, was involved with Harvard in various ways. All of them have hit the ground running. It’s been very smooth. Jessica Mathews and Ted Wells will be joining us in January. We’ve had extensive discussions with them during the search process, people have gotten to know them, and, since their selections were announced, they have been getting up to speed on the issues. While they’ve been a bit less involved than some of the others were, that kind of perspective can add a great deal to the group. Having spent time with both of them, I have every reason to believe that things will go as smoothly with them as with the first four.GAZETTE: How have the changes affected the interaction between the Corporation and the Board of Overseers?REISCHAUER: I’ve been on both boards, and I think the relationship has been progressing well. We have a new joint committee on alumni affairs and development, which is co-chaired by members of the two boards. There are former Overseers on the finance and facilities committees. We work together on the honorary degrees committee, and on the inspection committee, basically Harvard’s audit committee. We’ve worked closely together with groups of Overseers on the recent Corporation searches. We’ve been having pretty regular dinners with the Overseers executive committee, including one in early December, when we’ll talk about some of the major issues coming out of the visitation process, which the Overseers direct. A number of us on the Corporation now make a point of attending the Overseers’ plenary sessions. And at this point there are six of us on the Corporation who are former Overseers, including me. And the president and treasurer are both ex-officio Overseers as well as members of the Corporation. Besides the formal interactions in meetings, I think a lot of us look forward to connecting outside meetings when we can. I think there’s a growing sense of working together as a team, and I give the recent leaders of the Overseers a lot of credit for really helping to make that happen. We had a recent reunion of the members of both boards, back in September, and it’s a pretty extraordinary group.GAZETTE: At the time the governance changes were announced, you said you were also hoping to foster more connections between the Corporation and members of the Harvard community. Has that been happening?FAUST: Three of the members of the Corporation, besides me, now are Boston-based. Larry Bacow has an appointment at the Ed School. Bill Lee is very involved with Harvard. He’ll be teaching again in January in the problem-solving course at the Law School, and he gets around to lots of events on campus. So does Joe O’Donnell, who’s also one of our campaign chairs. All of them have interactions on campus on a quite regular basis in the areas of connection that are of the most interest to them.REISCHAUER: I’m one of those who come from out of town, so I don’t have quite the same opportunities to interact on a more informal basis with people around the University. But I and others among us have made a point of trying to spend extra time here and to get around to see people when we come for meetings. And we’ve also tried occasionally to gather and have dinner with small groups of students or faculty in a very informal way. In September, several of us had small dinners with some doctoral students from the Ed School’s higher-ed program, and with students from the J.D.-M.B.A. program. In April, after we’d gone to the i-lab, we had dinner with faculty involved in various kinds of innovation and entrepreneurship. We’d planned a dinner with a group of undergraduate student leaders in late October, but that was unfortunately a casualty of Hurricane Sandy. We’ll continue to look for these opportunities. We learn a lot from them.GAZETTE: Is there any area that has revealed itself over the past two years that you didn’t anticipate as part of the reforms?FAUST: Well, we had to create a bigger room for our meetings. We couldn’t fit any longer in the old one. That was one aspect of the change that wasn’t top of mind for me when we started out. But mainly I think things have played out so far along the lines we’d hoped.REISCHAUER: The thing I’ve found unexpected is how well it’s gone. Quite frankly, I thought that, with 300-plus years of tradition, it wouldn’t be as smooth a transition as it’s been. This past spring, we did a preliminary review involving interviews with Corporation members, the non-Corporation members of the finance and facilities committees, some Overseers, and various vice presidents and others who interact regularly with the Corporation. We wanted to get their impressions of how things are going, with the intent that we would fine-tune what is still a work in progress. We discussed the review at our summer retreat, and it was quite positive on all dimensions, and also helped point toward some things we need to stay focused on.GAZETTE: Is there anything about this process that you would want to add?REISCHAUER: I think from our perspective we have a lot more confidence that we’re having a constructive impact and that we have a governance structure that’s a better fit with the complexity and the scope of the modern University, that we’ve been able to improve the quality of discussion and the advice the Corporation is providing to Drew and to other leaders at Harvard.FAUST: I’m grateful for these changes in ways that I didn’t even anticipate when we were announcing them. I just feel able to do my job much better with this added support and capacity and broad expertise and engagement. I think it’s strengthened the University immeasurably, for the long run but also in very immediate ways.last_img read more

Inside India’s pop-up city

first_imgThis is the first in a series of articles on Harvard’s sweeping interdisciplinary work at the Kumbh Mela, a religious gathering in India that creates the world’s largest pop-up city. Learn more about “Mapping the Kumbh Mela” and follow SAI’s blog on the project here. View a list of resources on the Kumbh Mela, compiled by project co-sponsor the Harvard Global Health Institute here.Watch the Gazette for more stories on Harvard’s work at the Kumbh Mela in the coming weeks. ALLAHABAD, India — Life at the Kumbh Mela can be heard long before it can be seen.Two hours before dawn, the nonstop soundtrack of the world’s largest human gathering drifts up to an oasis of tents on a dusty hill overlooking the site of the Hindu festival. At the camp, a group of Harvard professors, students, and researchers fumbles its way into a few rented jeeps in the 5 a.m. darkness. As the fleet of vehicles makes its descent, the narrow road suddenly opens onto a view of the Kumbh Mela, a temporary tent city of millions of faithful Hindus, many of them already making their way to the banks of the Ganges River to bathe in its life-affirming waters.Normally, a crowd of Westerners wandering through the streets of the Kumbh would draw attention. But when the group arrives at the Ganga, as the sacred river is known, its presence hardly causes a stir.Still, it’s a curious sight. How did three dozen Harvardians — undergraduates and graduate students, case writers and professors, architects and anthropologists, doctors and documentarians — end up among millions of pilgrims?Meeting of rivers — and mindsFor one week in January, this sacred spot where the Ganges, the Yamuna, and the mythical Saraswati rivers meet has become a spot for a meeting of Harvard minds. An interdisciplinary team spearheaded by the South Asia Institute (SAI) arrived at the Kumbh on Jan. 18 with an ambitious plan to “map the metabolism of the city.”  The confluence of northern India’s holiest rivers holds a special significance for the millions of worshippers who attend the Kumbh, but the Harvard team is just as interested in the tent city that springs up alongside the water.“This idea of a megacity being set up on a temporary basis for 55 days, it’s just an incredible feat,” said Rahul Mehrotra, one of the project’s leaders and a professor of urban design and planning at the Harvard Graduate School of Design (GSD). “It’s an intersection of the visible, the invisible, the sacred, the profane. Everything is colliding.”Held every 12 years, the Kumbh Mela in Allahabad is a centuries-old Hindu pilgrimage with origins in the first century CE. The gathering temporarily transforms an empty floodplain into one of the biggest cities in the world.For much of the year, this area actually is covered by the Ganges. Only in October can the Kumbh Mela’s administrators and planners ascertain the lay of the land that they actually can use for the gathering. (As one guru put it while holding forth in an ashram, “The Ganga gives what she will give.”)By early January, a temporary city roughly the size of Cambridge has sprung up in the dusty sand to house hundreds of thousands of sadhus, or holy men, and millions of their followers for six weeks.On the main bathing days, planners expect upwards of 30 million visitors, and such days often draw media coverage for their sheer scale, devotion, and spectacle. But perhaps more impressive is the fact that the regular rhythms of life can exist at the temporary Kumbh, from a steady supply of water and electricity to the building of colorful, organic neighborhoods within each sector.“Our concern is to look at this in a much larger context, and not look only at the spectacular and the exotic,” said Diana Eck, a professor of comparative religion and Indian studies and Fredric Wertham Professor of Law and Psychiatry in Society, who co-taught a course on the Kumbh with Mehrotra in the fall. “The life of this mela — as a marketplace, as a place of teaching, of entertainment, of evening performances — is something that goes on every day.” (Mela is a Sanskrit word for gathering or marketplace.)The mela as microcosmWith that in mind, teams of professors, researchers, and students from across Harvard are meeting under one roof at the Kumbh to explore myriad issues related to rapid urbanization, public health, business, and religious expression at this year’s festival. The teams are studying everything from the way marketplaces operate, to the use and types of toilets at the Kumbh, to the allocation of living space within different akharas, or sects.The mela’s lessons, researchers hope, could be applied in many situations. Public health workers and doctors from Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) and Harvard Medical School (HMS) see the Kumbh as a model showing how to support mass migrations of people into small areas in the event of a war or natural disaster. Urban planners from GSD, working with Mehrotra, view the gathering as an example of how India — whose smaller cities are expected to grow dramatically in the coming years — can best support the natural, democratic development of communities. A Harvard Business School team dropped in for research, hoping to turn the Kumbh into one of its trademark case studies. And Eck, a leading scholar of India’s pilgrimage tradition, sees the Kumbh as an opportunity to wed Hinduism’s longstanding reverence for the natural environment and its sacred rivers to a growing campaign to clean up the Ganges.A whirlwind week at the Kumbh makes for a chaotic experience, but one that should prove fruitful for the type of ambitious multidisciplinary work that SAI fosters, said associate director Meena Hewett. As South Asia expands rapidly in both population and influence, Harvard can take the lead in understanding the region, she said. (SAI’s influence has recently grown as well. Under the leadership of director and Harvard Business School Professor Tarun Khanna since 2010, it was recently upgraded from an initiative to an institute within Harvard.)“I think Harvard has a lot to learn” from South Asia, Hewett said. “One thing you’ll hear from all faculty is the issue of scalability. It’s very easy to transform the lives of one or two individuals. But when you’re working on issues that affect 2 billion people, the impact is huge. The Kumbh Mela is a microcosm of the region.”last_img read more